Chronic chlorpheniramine therapy: Subsensitivity, drug metabolism, and compliance

E. W. Bantz, W. K. Dolen, E. W. Chadwick, H. S. Nelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

To investigate whether patients develop true subsensitivity to antihistamines during chronic therapy, we studied 14 adult subjects who received chlorpheniramine for 3-day and 3-week trials of therapy. Titrated skin tests to histamine and compound 48/80, chlorpheniramine blood levels (by HPLC), compliance, and side effects were monitored and compared during the two courses of therapy and their respective 72-hour washout periods. We found a significant correlation between chlorpheniramine blood levels and skin test suppression during both the 3-day and 3-week therapies. The 3-day chlorpheniramine therapy was more clinically effective (measured by skin test suppression corrected for serum chlorpheniramine concentration) than the 3-week therapy (P < .01). Chlorpheniramine serum half-lives and 2-hour chlorpheniramine blood levels were not significantly different after the 3-day and 3-week trials. Compliance was significantly worse (P < .01) during 3-week therapy. Medication side effects (particularly drowsiness) were frequently reported during both courses of therapy. We conclude that subsensitivity to chlorpheniramine does develop in adult patients receiving 3 weeks of therapy. This subsensitivity is not explained by changes in drug metabolism. In addition to subsensitivity, poor compliance may contribute to sub-therapeutic results during chronic antihistamine therapy. Side effects from antihistamines may also require individualization of therapy for certain patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)341-346
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Allergy
Volume59
Issue number5
StatePublished - Dec 1 1987

Fingerprint

Chlorpheniramine
Compliance
Drug Therapy
Histamine Antagonists
Therapeutics
Skin Tests
p-Methoxy-N-methylphenethylamine
Sleep Stages
Hematologic Tests
Serum
Histamine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Bantz, E. W., Dolen, W. K., Chadwick, E. W., & Nelson, H. S. (1987). Chronic chlorpheniramine therapy: Subsensitivity, drug metabolism, and compliance. Annals of Allergy, 59(5), 341-346.

Chronic chlorpheniramine therapy : Subsensitivity, drug metabolism, and compliance. / Bantz, E. W.; Dolen, W. K.; Chadwick, E. W.; Nelson, H. S.

In: Annals of Allergy, Vol. 59, No. 5, 01.12.1987, p. 341-346.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bantz, EW, Dolen, WK, Chadwick, EW & Nelson, HS 1987, 'Chronic chlorpheniramine therapy: Subsensitivity, drug metabolism, and compliance', Annals of Allergy, vol. 59, no. 5, pp. 341-346.
Bantz, E. W. ; Dolen, W. K. ; Chadwick, E. W. ; Nelson, H. S. / Chronic chlorpheniramine therapy : Subsensitivity, drug metabolism, and compliance. In: Annals of Allergy. 1987 ; Vol. 59, No. 5. pp. 341-346.
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