Clinical decision support and acute low back pain: Evidence-based order sets

Scott Evan Forseen, Amanda S. Corey

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Low back pain is one of the most common reasons for visits to physicians in the ambulatory care setting. Estimated medical expenditures related to low back pain have increased disproportionately relative to the more modest increase in the prevalence of self-reported low back pain in the past decade. The increase in spine care expenditures has not been associated with improved patient outcomes. Evidence-based order templates presented in this article are designed to assist practitioners through the process of managing patients with acute low back pain. A logical method of choosing, developing, and implementing clinical decision support interventions is presented that is based on the best available scientific evidence. These templates may be reasonably expected to improve patient care, decrease inappropriate imaging utilization, reduce the inappropriate use of steroids and narcotics, and potentially decrease the number of inappropriate invasive procedures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)704-712.e4
JournalJournal of the American College of Radiology
Volume9
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Fingerprint

Clinical Decision Support Systems
Low Back Pain
Health Expenditures
Narcotics
Ambulatory Care
Patient Care
Spine
Steroids
Physicians

Keywords

  • Acute low back pain
  • clinical practice guidelines
  • computerized decision support
  • computerized order entry systems
  • imaging utilization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Clinical decision support and acute low back pain : Evidence-based order sets. / Forseen, Scott Evan; Corey, Amanda S.

In: Journal of the American College of Radiology, Vol. 9, No. 10, 01.01.2012, p. 704-712.e4.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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