Clinical features of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage in Hispanics and non-Hispanic Whites in New Mexico: A community study

Askiel Bruno, Shelley Carter, Clifford Qualls

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To compare clinical features of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) between Hispanics and non-Hispanic Whites in Albuquerque, New Mexico, occurring during the year 1993. Design: Analysis of data collected during a study of ICH incidence in a community. Methods: Review medical records with multiple relevant cerebrovascular diagnostic discharge codes in all 9 acute care hospitals in Albuquerque, and in the records of the State Medical Examiner. All suspected cases were verified by cerebral computed tomography or autopsy. Vascular risk factors, test results, and acute outcome were abstracted. Results: There were 38 Hispanics and 46 non-Hispanic Whites with ICH. We found no statistically significant differences between these two ethnic groups in the prevalence of hypertension or diabetes mellitus, in hematoma volume, in seasonal fluctuation of ICH incidence, or in acute mortality. However, based on our sample size, only large differences in the prevalence of risk factors between these two ethnic groups could be detected with statistical significance (>20-30 percentage points). There was a trend toward a higher proportion of subcortical ICH (centered in the basal ganglia, brainstem, or cerebellum) in Hispanics (82%) than in non-Hispanic Whites (62%, P=.09). Conclusions: The higher proportion of subcortical ICH among the Hispanics suggests that chronic hypertension may play a greater role as a risk factor for ICH in this ethnic group than in non-Hispanic Whites in New Mexico. Our findings should be confirmed by larger community studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)406-410
Number of pages5
JournalEthnicity and Disease
Volume10
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cerebral Hemorrhage
Hispanic Americans
Ethnic Groups
Hypertension
Coroners and Medical Examiners
Incidence
Basal Ganglia
Hematoma
Sample Size
Cerebellum
Brain Stem
Medical Records
Autopsy
Diabetes Mellitus
Tomography
Mortality

Keywords

  • Ethnicity
  • Hispanic
  • Intracerebral Hemorrhage
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Clinical features of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage in Hispanics and non-Hispanic Whites in New Mexico : A community study. / Bruno, Askiel; Carter, Shelley; Qualls, Clifford.

In: Ethnicity and Disease, Vol. 10, No. 3, 01.09.2000, p. 406-410.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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