Clinical pharmacists as educators in family medicine residency programs

A CERA study of program directors

Jennie B. Jarrett, Jody L. Lounsbery, Frank D’Amico, Lori M. Dickerson, John Franko, John Nagle, Dean Seehusen, Stephen A. Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The clinical pharmacist’s role within family medicine residency programs (FMRPs) is well established. However, there is limited information regarding perceptions of program directors (PDs) about clinical pharmacy educators. The study objectives were (1) to estimate the prevalence of clinical pharmacists within FMRPs and (2) to determine barriers and motivations for incorporation of clinical pharmacists as educators. METHODS: The Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA) distributed an electronic survey to PDs. Questions addressed formalized pharmacotherapy education, clinical pharmacists in educator roles, and barriers and benefits of clinical pharmacists in FMRPs. RESULTS: The overall response rate was 50% (224/451). Seventy- six percent (170/224) of the responding PDs reported that clinical pharmacists provide pharmacotherapy education in their FMRPs, and 57% (97/170) consider clinical pharmacists as faculty members. In programs with clinical pharmacists, 72% (83/116) of PDs reported having a systematic approach for teaching pharmacotherapy versus 22% (21/95) in programs without. In programs without clinical pharmacists, the top barrier to incorporation was limited ability to bill for clinical services 48% (43/89) versus 29% (32/112) in programs with clinical pharmacists. In both programs with and without clinical pharmacists, the top benefit of having clinical pharmacists was providing a collaborative approach to pharmacotherapy education for residents (35% and 36%, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Less than half of FMRPs incorporate clinical pharmacists as faculty members. Despite providing collaborative approaches to pharmacotherapy education, their limited ability to bill for services is a major barrier.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)180-186
Number of pages7
JournalFamily medicine
Volume48
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Internship and Residency
Pharmacists
Medicine
Drug Therapy
Education
Aptitude
Motivation
Teaching

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice

Cite this

Jarrett, J. B., Lounsbery, J. L., D’Amico, F., Dickerson, L. M., Franko, J., Nagle, J., ... Wilson, S. A. (2016). Clinical pharmacists as educators in family medicine residency programs: A CERA study of program directors. Family medicine, 48(3), 180-186.

Clinical pharmacists as educators in family medicine residency programs : A CERA study of program directors. / Jarrett, Jennie B.; Lounsbery, Jody L.; D’Amico, Frank; Dickerson, Lori M.; Franko, John; Nagle, John; Seehusen, Dean; Wilson, Stephen A.

In: Family medicine, Vol. 48, No. 3, 01.03.2016, p. 180-186.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jarrett, JB, Lounsbery, JL, D’Amico, F, Dickerson, LM, Franko, J, Nagle, J, Seehusen, D & Wilson, SA 2016, 'Clinical pharmacists as educators in family medicine residency programs: A CERA study of program directors', Family medicine, vol. 48, no. 3, pp. 180-186.
Jarrett JB, Lounsbery JL, D’Amico F, Dickerson LM, Franko J, Nagle J et al. Clinical pharmacists as educators in family medicine residency programs: A CERA study of program directors. Family medicine. 2016 Mar 1;48(3):180-186.
Jarrett, Jennie B. ; Lounsbery, Jody L. ; D’Amico, Frank ; Dickerson, Lori M. ; Franko, John ; Nagle, John ; Seehusen, Dean ; Wilson, Stephen A. / Clinical pharmacists as educators in family medicine residency programs : A CERA study of program directors. In: Family medicine. 2016 ; Vol. 48, No. 3. pp. 180-186.
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