Cognitive and behavioral problems in children with centrotemporal spikes

Ada W.Y. Yung, Yong D Park, Morris J. Cohen, Tara N. Garrison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

96 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Atypical features in benign epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS) are not uncommon. There are children with BECTS who do not have a benign outcome in terms of neuropsychologic functioning. BECTS have been linked with Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS) and continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep (CSWS). At the Medical College of Georgia from January 1988 to June 1999, 78 children, ages 2-16 years, were identified to have electroencephalogram evidence of centrotemporal spikes. Their medical records were reviewed for developmental history, behavioral problems, and school performance. Children with structural lesions/other epileptic syndromes were excluded. Fifty-six demonstrated a history of clinical seizures compatible with BECTS and 22 demonstrated centrotemporal spikes without clinical seizures. Among all children with centrotemporal spikes, 9% (n = 7) were diagnosed with mild intellectual disability (intelligence quotient < 70), 10% (n = 8) with borderline functioning, 31% (n = 24) with behavioral problems, and 17% (n = 13) with specific learning disabilities. Three children with BECTS experienced language delay and regression. Seizure control for BECTS usually is achieved without much difficulty, with excellent long-term prognosis. However, the data presented indicate that a large number of BECTS patients exhibit learning or behavior problems that require intervention. A small number may demonstrate language outcome similar to children with LKS and CSWS. (C) 2000 by Elsevier Science Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)391-395
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric Neurology
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 21 2000

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Rolandic Epilepsy
Landau-Kleffner Syndrome
Seizures
Sleep
Language Development Disorders
Learning Disorders
Problem Behavior
Intelligence
Intellectual Disability
Medical Records
Electroencephalography
Language
Learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Neurology
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Cognitive and behavioral problems in children with centrotemporal spikes. / Yung, Ada W.Y.; Park, Yong D; Cohen, Morris J.; Garrison, Tara N.

In: Pediatric Neurology, Vol. 23, No. 5, 21.12.2000, p. 391-395.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yung, Ada W.Y. ; Park, Yong D ; Cohen, Morris J. ; Garrison, Tara N. / Cognitive and behavioral problems in children with centrotemporal spikes. In: Pediatric Neurology. 2000 ; Vol. 23, No. 5. pp. 391-395.
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