Comparison of knowledge and attitudes toward human papillomavirus, HPV vaccine, pap tests, and cervical cancer between US and Peruvian women

Chi Son Han, Daron Gale Ferris, Jennifer L Waller, Philip Tharp, Jessica Walter, Lynn Allmond

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the knowledge and attitudes toward human papillomavirus (HPV), HPV vaccine, Pap tests, and cervical cancer among US and Peruvian women. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A convenience sample of 275 US women in Augusta, GA, and 702 Peruvian women living in or near Cusco, Peru, completed 22- or 21-item questionnaires, respectively. These questionnaires determined their knowledge about HPV, the HPV vaccine, Pap tests, and cervical cancer. Simple logistic regression was used to determine the relationship between location and language on the correct responses. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. RESULTS: US Spanish- (OR = 0.02), Quechua- (OR = 0.05), and Peru Spanish-speaking women (OR = 0.03) were significantly less likely to know that HPV causes cervical cancer compared with US non-Spanish-speaking women. US Spanish- (OR = 10.61, OR = 5.74), Quechua- (OR = 11.08, OR = 9.89), and Peru Spanish-speaking women (OR = 17.25, 14.43) were significantly more likely to be embarrassed and afraid, respectively, to get a Pap test compared with US non-Spanish-speaking women. US Spanish- (OR = 0.11), Quechua- (OR = 0.14), and Peru Spanish-speaking women (OR = 0.11) women were significantly less likely to know the HPV vaccine is safe and effective compared with US non-Spanish-speaking women. CONCLUSIONS: Education must be implemented to address serious misconceptions and worrisome attitudes toward Pap tests and the HPV vaccine to decrease the rate of cervical cancer in Peru and US Spanish-speaking women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)121-126
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Lower Genital Tract Disease
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2012

Fingerprint

Papanicolaou Test
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Odds Ratio
Peru
Language

Keywords

  • attitudes
  • cervical cancer
  • human papillomavirus
  • knowledge
  • Pap test

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Comparison of knowledge and attitudes toward human papillomavirus, HPV vaccine, pap tests, and cervical cancer between US and Peruvian women. / Han, Chi Son; Ferris, Daron Gale; Waller, Jennifer L; Tharp, Philip; Walter, Jessica; Allmond, Lynn.

In: Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease, Vol. 16, No. 2, 01.04.2012, p. 121-126.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{7586151843044850a517b535509e17d1,
title = "Comparison of knowledge and attitudes toward human papillomavirus, HPV vaccine, pap tests, and cervical cancer between US and Peruvian women",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the knowledge and attitudes toward human papillomavirus (HPV), HPV vaccine, Pap tests, and cervical cancer among US and Peruvian women. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A convenience sample of 275 US women in Augusta, GA, and 702 Peruvian women living in or near Cusco, Peru, completed 22- or 21-item questionnaires, respectively. These questionnaires determined their knowledge about HPV, the HPV vaccine, Pap tests, and cervical cancer. Simple logistic regression was used to determine the relationship between location and language on the correct responses. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95{\%} confidence intervals were calculated. RESULTS: US Spanish- (OR = 0.02), Quechua- (OR = 0.05), and Peru Spanish-speaking women (OR = 0.03) were significantly less likely to know that HPV causes cervical cancer compared with US non-Spanish-speaking women. US Spanish- (OR = 10.61, OR = 5.74), Quechua- (OR = 11.08, OR = 9.89), and Peru Spanish-speaking women (OR = 17.25, 14.43) were significantly more likely to be embarrassed and afraid, respectively, to get a Pap test compared with US non-Spanish-speaking women. US Spanish- (OR = 0.11), Quechua- (OR = 0.14), and Peru Spanish-speaking women (OR = 0.11) women were significantly less likely to know the HPV vaccine is safe and effective compared with US non-Spanish-speaking women. CONCLUSIONS: Education must be implemented to address serious misconceptions and worrisome attitudes toward Pap tests and the HPV vaccine to decrease the rate of cervical cancer in Peru and US Spanish-speaking women.",
keywords = "attitudes, cervical cancer, human papillomavirus, knowledge, Pap test",
author = "Han, {Chi Son} and Ferris, {Daron Gale} and Waller, {Jennifer L} and Philip Tharp and Jessica Walter and Lynn Allmond",
year = "2012",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/LGT.0b013e31823a05a3",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "16",
pages = "121--126",
journal = "Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease",
issn = "1089-2591",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparison of knowledge and attitudes toward human papillomavirus, HPV vaccine, pap tests, and cervical cancer between US and Peruvian women

AU - Han, Chi Son

AU - Ferris, Daron Gale

AU - Waller, Jennifer L

AU - Tharp, Philip

AU - Walter, Jessica

AU - Allmond, Lynn

PY - 2012/4/1

Y1 - 2012/4/1

N2 - OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the knowledge and attitudes toward human papillomavirus (HPV), HPV vaccine, Pap tests, and cervical cancer among US and Peruvian women. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A convenience sample of 275 US women in Augusta, GA, and 702 Peruvian women living in or near Cusco, Peru, completed 22- or 21-item questionnaires, respectively. These questionnaires determined their knowledge about HPV, the HPV vaccine, Pap tests, and cervical cancer. Simple logistic regression was used to determine the relationship between location and language on the correct responses. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. RESULTS: US Spanish- (OR = 0.02), Quechua- (OR = 0.05), and Peru Spanish-speaking women (OR = 0.03) were significantly less likely to know that HPV causes cervical cancer compared with US non-Spanish-speaking women. US Spanish- (OR = 10.61, OR = 5.74), Quechua- (OR = 11.08, OR = 9.89), and Peru Spanish-speaking women (OR = 17.25, 14.43) were significantly more likely to be embarrassed and afraid, respectively, to get a Pap test compared with US non-Spanish-speaking women. US Spanish- (OR = 0.11), Quechua- (OR = 0.14), and Peru Spanish-speaking women (OR = 0.11) women were significantly less likely to know the HPV vaccine is safe and effective compared with US non-Spanish-speaking women. CONCLUSIONS: Education must be implemented to address serious misconceptions and worrisome attitudes toward Pap tests and the HPV vaccine to decrease the rate of cervical cancer in Peru and US Spanish-speaking women.

AB - OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the knowledge and attitudes toward human papillomavirus (HPV), HPV vaccine, Pap tests, and cervical cancer among US and Peruvian women. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A convenience sample of 275 US women in Augusta, GA, and 702 Peruvian women living in or near Cusco, Peru, completed 22- or 21-item questionnaires, respectively. These questionnaires determined their knowledge about HPV, the HPV vaccine, Pap tests, and cervical cancer. Simple logistic regression was used to determine the relationship between location and language on the correct responses. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. RESULTS: US Spanish- (OR = 0.02), Quechua- (OR = 0.05), and Peru Spanish-speaking women (OR = 0.03) were significantly less likely to know that HPV causes cervical cancer compared with US non-Spanish-speaking women. US Spanish- (OR = 10.61, OR = 5.74), Quechua- (OR = 11.08, OR = 9.89), and Peru Spanish-speaking women (OR = 17.25, 14.43) were significantly more likely to be embarrassed and afraid, respectively, to get a Pap test compared with US non-Spanish-speaking women. US Spanish- (OR = 0.11), Quechua- (OR = 0.14), and Peru Spanish-speaking women (OR = 0.11) women were significantly less likely to know the HPV vaccine is safe and effective compared with US non-Spanish-speaking women. CONCLUSIONS: Education must be implemented to address serious misconceptions and worrisome attitudes toward Pap tests and the HPV vaccine to decrease the rate of cervical cancer in Peru and US Spanish-speaking women.

KW - attitudes

KW - cervical cancer

KW - human papillomavirus

KW - knowledge

KW - Pap test

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84858159694&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84858159694&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/LGT.0b013e31823a05a3

DO - 10.1097/LGT.0b013e31823a05a3

M3 - Article

C2 - 22227842

AN - SCOPUS:84858159694

VL - 16

SP - 121

EP - 126

JO - Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease

JF - Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease

SN - 1089-2591

IS - 2

ER -