Competitive balance in women’s collegiate cross country running

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Women started competing in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) cross country championships in 1981 and participation in Division 1 women’s cross country has increased by 174%. Using data covering 34 years of Division 1 championships we find some evidence that competitive balance in women’s races improved with increased participation although results are sensitive to how competitive balance is measured and how participation is counted. Violations of social choice preferences may explain the lack of robustness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalApplied Economics Letters
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Competitive balance
Participation
Social choice
Violations
Athletics
Robustness

Keywords

  • Competitive balance
  • NCAA
  • Title IX
  • running
  • social choice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

Competitive balance in women’s collegiate cross country running. / Medcalfe, Simon K; Ndhlovu, Pardon; Thompson, Mark Andrew.

In: Applied Economics Letters, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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