Contribution of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor to exercise-induced vasodilation in health and hypercholesterolemia

Muhiddin A. Ozkor, Salim S. Hayek, Ayaz M. Rahman, Jonathan R Murrow, Nino Kavtaradze, Ji Lin, Amita Manatunga, Arshed A. Quyyumi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The role of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) in either the healthy circulation or in those with hypercholesterolemia is unknown. In healthy and hypercholesterolemic subjects, we measured forearm blood flow (FBF) using strain-gauge plethysmography at rest, during graded handgrip exercise, and after sodium nitroprusside infusion. Measurements were repeated after l-NMMA, tetraethylammonium (TEA), and combined infusions. At rest, l-NMMA infusion reduced FBF in healthy but not hypercholesterolemic subjects. At peak exercise, vasodilation was lower in hypercholesterolemic compared to healthy subjects (274% vs 438% increase in FBF, p=0.017). TEA infusion reduced exercise-induced vasodilation in both healthy and hypercholesterolemic subjects (27%, p<0.0001 and -20%, p<0.0001, respectively). The addition of l-NMMA to TEA further reduced FBF in healthy (-14%, p=0.012) but not in hypercholesterolemic subjects, indicating a reduced nitric oxide and greater EDHF-mediated contribution to exercise-induced vasodilation in hypercholesterolemia. In conclusion, exercise-induced vasodilation is impaired and predominantly mediated by EDHF in hypercholesterolemic subjects. Clinical Trial Registration Identifier: NCT00166166.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)14-22
Number of pages9
JournalVascular Medicine (United Kingdom)
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 15 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hypercholesterolemia
Vasodilation
Endothelium
Forearm
Tetraethylammonium
Exercise
Health
Healthy Volunteers
Plethysmography
Nitroprusside
Nitric Oxide
Clinical Trials

Keywords

  • endothelial function
  • endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor
  • exercise
  • hypercholesterolemia
  • nitric oxide
  • vasodilation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Contribution of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor to exercise-induced vasodilation in health and hypercholesterolemia. / Ozkor, Muhiddin A.; Hayek, Salim S.; Rahman, Ayaz M.; Murrow, Jonathan R; Kavtaradze, Nino; Lin, Ji; Manatunga, Amita; Quyyumi, Arshed A.

In: Vascular Medicine (United Kingdom), Vol. 20, No. 1, 15.02.2015, p. 14-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ozkor, Muhiddin A. ; Hayek, Salim S. ; Rahman, Ayaz M. ; Murrow, Jonathan R ; Kavtaradze, Nino ; Lin, Ji ; Manatunga, Amita ; Quyyumi, Arshed A. / Contribution of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor to exercise-induced vasodilation in health and hypercholesterolemia. In: Vascular Medicine (United Kingdom). 2015 ; Vol. 20, No. 1. pp. 14-22.
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