Control of renal function and blood pressure by angiotensin II: Implications for diabetic glomerular injury

Michael W Brands, Joey P. Granger

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A principal, and unique, renal effector site for angiotensin II (ANG II) is the efferent arteriole, and that has generated considerable interest regarding potential benefits of ANG II inhibition in the treatment and prevention of diabetic renal injury. A hallmark complication of long-standing diabetes is glomerular injury, and there is substantial evidence that lowering glomerular hydrostatic pressure attenuates the injury process. One way that has been accomplished is by lowering arterial pressure, but additional evidence suggests that anti-hypertensive treatment with ANG II inhibition provides even greater protection because of the associated efferent arteriolar dilation. Because of that action, ANG II inhibition in diabetes has been advocated even without diagnosis of hypertension, and the benefits of that treatment have been ascribed largely to the effect of decreased efferent arteriolar resistance to lower glomerular hydrostatic pressure. However, that renal vascular action of ANG II, together with powerful direct effects on tubular sodium reabsorption, underlie its dominant influence on chronic arterial pressure control. Moreover, the influence of ANG II on arterial pressure is not limited to hypertension; it contributes significantly to the maintenance of blood pressure when plasma ANG II levels are normal or even reduced. Thus, while acknowledging that efferent arteriolar dilation is a unique intrarenal benefit associated with ANG II inhibition, this review will focus on how and why inhibition of the multiple intrarenal actions of ANG II also protect the kidneys through systemic mechanisms, even when blood pressure and ANG II are not increased.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)371-380
Number of pages10
JournalMineral and Electrolyte Metabolism
Volume24
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Blood pressure
Angiotensin II
Blood Pressure
Kidney
Wounds and Injuries
Arterial Pressure
Hydrostatic Pressure
Hydrostatic pressure
Medical problems
Dilatation
Hypertension
Pressure control
Arterioles
Antihypertensive Agents
Blood Vessels
Sodium
Maintenance
Plasmas

Keywords

  • Angiotensin II
  • Arterial pressure
  • Diabetes
  • Kidneys
  • Sodium excretion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Control of renal function and blood pressure by angiotensin II : Implications for diabetic glomerular injury. / Brands, Michael W; Granger, Joey P.

In: Mineral and Electrolyte Metabolism, Vol. 24, No. 6, 01.11.1998, p. 371-380.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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