Control of virus-specific CD8+ T-cell exhaustion and immune-mediated pathology by E3 ubiquitin ligase Cbl-b during chronic viral infection

Rong Ou, Menghua Zhang, Lei Huang, Dimitrios Moskofidis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A characteristic feature in the immune response to many persistent viral infections is the dysfunction or deletion of antigen-specific T cells (exhaustion). This down-regulation of virus-specific T-cell response represents a critical control mechanism that exists within T-cell activation pathways to prevent lethal disease by inappropriate responses against disseminating virus infections. However, the molecular mechanisms by which the immune system determines whether to mount a full response to such infections remain largely unexplored. Here, we have established that in the murine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) model, induction of the T-cell receptor signaling inhibitor molecule E3 ligase Cbl-b is critically involved in this decision. In particular, our data revealed that Cbl-b controls the program responsible for T-cell tolerance (exhaustion) induction during a chronic viral infection. Thus, Cbl-b-/- mice infected with a low dose of LCMV Docile mount a strong CD8+ T-cell response that rapidly clears the infection, and the animals remain healthy; in contrast, down-regulation of the epitope-specific CD8+ T-cell population in persistently infected Cbl-b-/- mice, compared to that in chronically infected B6 mice, was significantly delayed, and this was associated with increased morbidity and eventual death in nearly 20% of the animals. Interestingly, infection of Cbl-b-/- mice with a moderate virus dose resulted in rapid death with 100% mortality by 7 to 8 days after infection, caused by a dysregulated antiviral T-cell response, whereas the infected B6 mice survived and remained healthy. In conclusion, our results suggest that Cbl-b is critically involved in T-cell exhaustion and prevention of lethal disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3353-3368
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume82
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2008

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ubiquitin-protein ligase
Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases
Virus Diseases
T-lymphocytes
Pathology
Viruses
T-Lymphocytes
viruses
infection
mice
Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus
Infection
Down-Regulation
Virus Activation
death
T-Cell Antigen Receptor
dosage
Antiviral Agents
ligases
Epitopes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Insect Science
  • Virology

Cite this

Control of virus-specific CD8+ T-cell exhaustion and immune-mediated pathology by E3 ubiquitin ligase Cbl-b during chronic viral infection. / Ou, Rong; Zhang, Menghua; Huang, Lei; Moskofidis, Dimitrios.

In: Journal of Virology, Vol. 82, No. 7, 01.04.2008, p. 3353-3368.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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