Correlates of adherence to a physical activity program in young African-American girls

Christian Lemmon, David A. Ludwig, Cheryl A. Howe, Ayanay Ferguson-Smith, Paule Barbeau

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The goal was to identify correlates of adherence to a structured physical activity (PA) program. Research Methods and Procedures: Subjects were 136 8-to 12-year-old African-American girls. Potential correlates at baseline were: 1) fitness index (FI: % body fat from DXA and cardiovascular fitness from treadmill test), and 2) self-esteem, anxiety, attitude to school and teachers, relationship with parents, and interpersonal relations (Behavioral Assessment System for Children). The 10-month PA program included 80 minutes of PA offered 5 days/wk. Regression tree classification was used to model attendance. Results: Six splits occurred (34% total variance explained). Less anxious subjects attended more often than highly anxious subjects (3 days/wk vs. 1.5 days/wk) did. Subjects with a healthier FI attended more often than those with a less healthy FI (3 days/wk vs. 0.5 days/wk) did. Younger subjects attended more often than older ones (3 days/wk vs. 2.5 days/wk) did. The next two splits were again with anxiety (3.5 days/wk vs. 3 days/wk) and FI (3 days/wk vs. 2.5 days/wk). Finally, subjects with higher levels of self-esteem attended more often than those with lower levels (3.5 days/wk vs. 2 days/wk) did. Discussion: Subjects who were self-confident, younger, fitter, and less anxious were more likely to participate regularly. This suggests that children who may be more likely to benefit from a PA program are less likely to participate. To enhance participation in PA programs, especially in older African-American girls: 1) psychological concerns should be identified and addressed before enrollment, and 2) programs should be designed to be appealing to children of all fitness levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)695-703
Number of pages9
JournalObesity
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

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African Americans
Exercise
Self Concept
Anxiety
Interpersonal Relations
Exercise Test
Adipose Tissue
Parents
Psychology
Research

Keywords

  • Adiposity
  • Anxiety
  • Children
  • Physical fitness
  • Self-esteem

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Correlates of adherence to a physical activity program in young African-American girls. / Lemmon, Christian; Ludwig, David A.; Howe, Cheryl A.; Ferguson-Smith, Ayanay; Barbeau, Paule.

In: Obesity, Vol. 15, No. 3, 01.01.2007, p. 695-703.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lemmon, C, Ludwig, DA, Howe, CA, Ferguson-Smith, A & Barbeau, P 2007, 'Correlates of adherence to a physical activity program in young African-American girls', Obesity, vol. 15, no. 3, pp. 695-703. https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2007.552
Lemmon, Christian ; Ludwig, David A. ; Howe, Cheryl A. ; Ferguson-Smith, Ayanay ; Barbeau, Paule. / Correlates of adherence to a physical activity program in young African-American girls. In: Obesity. 2007 ; Vol. 15, No. 3. pp. 695-703.
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