Current and future psychotherapy trends in United States graduate psychiatric training

Anu A. Matorin, Robert W. Guynn, Sandra Griffin Bishop Sexson, Vinay Kapoot, Pedro Ruiz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. To assess the current role of psychotherapy during graduate training in the United States. Methods. A questionnaire was distributed to one hundred and sixty general graduate psychiatric training programs in the United States. Results. Programs reported an increase in psychotherapy training in anticipation of the competency-based guidelines recently delineated and approved by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). A majority of respondents (54%) reported an increase in psychotherapy training in their programs in the last 2 years, while 42% of respondents anticipate an increase in the next 2 years. The emphasis during graduate psychiatric training remains on individual psychotherapy, with 75% of the total psychotherapy seminar hours dedicated to this topic. However, current and anticipated funding for psychotherapy training remains stagnant. The majority of the programs (78%) reported no changes in funding during the last 2 years, while 75% of the programs anticipate funding to remain unchanged in the next 2 years. Graduate training programs are considering a variety of assessment tools to objectively document residency competency in psychotherapy. Conclusions. Graduate medical education and, in particular, graduate psychiatric training is currently facing major training challenges. While funding has not increased, new training priorities are more demanding with respect to the implementation of the new core competency model recently established by the ACGME and the American Board of Medical Specialties (ASMS).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)26-30
Number of pages5
JournalRivista di Psichiatria
Volume40
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

Fingerprint

Psychotherapy
Psychiatry
Graduate Medical Education
Accreditation
Education
Internship and Residency
Medicine
Guidelines
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • ABMS
  • ACGME
  • Graduate psychiatric training
  • Psychotherapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Current and future psychotherapy trends in United States graduate psychiatric training. / Matorin, Anu A.; Guynn, Robert W.; Sexson, Sandra Griffin Bishop; Kapoot, Vinay; Ruiz, Pedro.

In: Rivista di Psichiatria, Vol. 40, No. 1, 01.01.2005, p. 26-30.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Matorin, AA, Guynn, RW, Sexson, SGB, Kapoot, V & Ruiz, P 2005, 'Current and future psychotherapy trends in United States graduate psychiatric training', Rivista di Psichiatria, vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 26-30.
Matorin, Anu A. ; Guynn, Robert W. ; Sexson, Sandra Griffin Bishop ; Kapoot, Vinay ; Ruiz, Pedro. / Current and future psychotherapy trends in United States graduate psychiatric training. In: Rivista di Psichiatria. 2005 ; Vol. 40, No. 1. pp. 26-30.
@article{ce40350fd57d40518a4d07d8d38d9e69,
title = "Current and future psychotherapy trends in United States graduate psychiatric training",
abstract = "Objective. To assess the current role of psychotherapy during graduate training in the United States. Methods. A questionnaire was distributed to one hundred and sixty general graduate psychiatric training programs in the United States. Results. Programs reported an increase in psychotherapy training in anticipation of the competency-based guidelines recently delineated and approved by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). A majority of respondents (54{\%}) reported an increase in psychotherapy training in their programs in the last 2 years, while 42{\%} of respondents anticipate an increase in the next 2 years. The emphasis during graduate psychiatric training remains on individual psychotherapy, with 75{\%} of the total psychotherapy seminar hours dedicated to this topic. However, current and anticipated funding for psychotherapy training remains stagnant. The majority of the programs (78{\%}) reported no changes in funding during the last 2 years, while 75{\%} of the programs anticipate funding to remain unchanged in the next 2 years. Graduate training programs are considering a variety of assessment tools to objectively document residency competency in psychotherapy. Conclusions. Graduate medical education and, in particular, graduate psychiatric training is currently facing major training challenges. While funding has not increased, new training priorities are more demanding with respect to the implementation of the new core competency model recently established by the ACGME and the American Board of Medical Specialties (ASMS).",
keywords = "ABMS, ACGME, Graduate psychiatric training, Psychotherapy",
author = "Matorin, {Anu A.} and Guynn, {Robert W.} and Sexson, {Sandra Griffin Bishop} and Vinay Kapoot and Pedro Ruiz",
year = "2005",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "40",
pages = "26--30",
journal = "Rivista di Psichiatria",
issn = "0035-6484",
publisher = "Il Pensiero Scientifico Editore s.r.l.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Current and future psychotherapy trends in United States graduate psychiatric training

AU - Matorin, Anu A.

AU - Guynn, Robert W.

AU - Sexson, Sandra Griffin Bishop

AU - Kapoot, Vinay

AU - Ruiz, Pedro

PY - 2005/1/1

Y1 - 2005/1/1

N2 - Objective. To assess the current role of psychotherapy during graduate training in the United States. Methods. A questionnaire was distributed to one hundred and sixty general graduate psychiatric training programs in the United States. Results. Programs reported an increase in psychotherapy training in anticipation of the competency-based guidelines recently delineated and approved by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). A majority of respondents (54%) reported an increase in psychotherapy training in their programs in the last 2 years, while 42% of respondents anticipate an increase in the next 2 years. The emphasis during graduate psychiatric training remains on individual psychotherapy, with 75% of the total psychotherapy seminar hours dedicated to this topic. However, current and anticipated funding for psychotherapy training remains stagnant. The majority of the programs (78%) reported no changes in funding during the last 2 years, while 75% of the programs anticipate funding to remain unchanged in the next 2 years. Graduate training programs are considering a variety of assessment tools to objectively document residency competency in psychotherapy. Conclusions. Graduate medical education and, in particular, graduate psychiatric training is currently facing major training challenges. While funding has not increased, new training priorities are more demanding with respect to the implementation of the new core competency model recently established by the ACGME and the American Board of Medical Specialties (ASMS).

AB - Objective. To assess the current role of psychotherapy during graduate training in the United States. Methods. A questionnaire was distributed to one hundred and sixty general graduate psychiatric training programs in the United States. Results. Programs reported an increase in psychotherapy training in anticipation of the competency-based guidelines recently delineated and approved by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). A majority of respondents (54%) reported an increase in psychotherapy training in their programs in the last 2 years, while 42% of respondents anticipate an increase in the next 2 years. The emphasis during graduate psychiatric training remains on individual psychotherapy, with 75% of the total psychotherapy seminar hours dedicated to this topic. However, current and anticipated funding for psychotherapy training remains stagnant. The majority of the programs (78%) reported no changes in funding during the last 2 years, while 75% of the programs anticipate funding to remain unchanged in the next 2 years. Graduate training programs are considering a variety of assessment tools to objectively document residency competency in psychotherapy. Conclusions. Graduate medical education and, in particular, graduate psychiatric training is currently facing major training challenges. While funding has not increased, new training priorities are more demanding with respect to the implementation of the new core competency model recently established by the ACGME and the American Board of Medical Specialties (ASMS).

KW - ABMS

KW - ACGME

KW - Graduate psychiatric training

KW - Psychotherapy

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=15244349839&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=15244349839&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:15244349839

VL - 40

SP - 26

EP - 30

JO - Rivista di Psichiatria

JF - Rivista di Psichiatria

SN - 0035-6484

IS - 1

ER -