Current status of zirconia-based fixed restorations.

Futoshi Komine, Markus B. Blatz, Hideo Matsumura

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

97 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Zirconium dioxide (zirconia) ceramics are currently used for fixed restorations as a framework material due to their mechanical and optical properties. This review article describes the current status of zirconia-based fixed restorations, including results of current in vitro studies and the clinical performance of these restorations. Adaptation of zirconia-based restorations fabricated with CAD/CAM technology is within an acceptable range to meet clinical requirements. In terms of fracture resistance, zirconia-based fixed partial dentures (FPDs) have the potential to withstand physiological occlusal forces applied in the posterior region, and therefore provide interesting alternatives to metal-ceramic restorations. Clinical evaluations have indicated an excellent clinical survival of zirconia-based FPDs and crown restorations. However, some clinical studies have revealed a high incidence of chipping of veneered porcelain. Full-coverage zirconia-based restorations with adequate retention do not require resin bonding for definitive cementation. Resin bonding, however, may be advantageous in certain clinical situations and is a necessity for bonded restorations, such as resin-bonded FPDs. Combined surface treatment using airborne particle abrasion and specific adhesives with a hydrophobic phosphate monomer are currently reliable for bonding to zirconia ceramics. Further clinical and in vitro studies are needed to obtain long-term clinical information on zirconia-based restorations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)531-539
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of oral science
Volume52
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

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Fixed Partial Denture
Ceramics
Resin-Bonded Fixed Partial Denture
Metal Ceramic Alloys
Cementation
Bite Force
zirconium oxide
Computer-Aided Design
Dental Porcelain
Crowns
Adhesives
Phosphates
Technology
Incidence
In Vitro Techniques
Clinical Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Current status of zirconia-based fixed restorations. / Komine, Futoshi; Blatz, Markus B.; Matsumura, Hideo.

In: Journal of oral science, Vol. 52, No. 4, 01.01.2010, p. 531-539.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Komine, F, Blatz, MB & Matsumura, H 2010, 'Current status of zirconia-based fixed restorations.', Journal of oral science, vol. 52, no. 4, pp. 531-539. https://doi.org/10.2334/josnusd.52.531
Komine, Futoshi ; Blatz, Markus B. ; Matsumura, Hideo. / Current status of zirconia-based fixed restorations. In: Journal of oral science. 2010 ; Vol. 52, No. 4. pp. 531-539.
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