Cytotoxic chemotherapy and CD4+ effector T cells

An emerging alliance for durable antitumor effects

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Standard cytotoxic chemotherapy can initially achieve high response rates, but relapses often occur in patients and represent a severe clinical problem. As increasing numbers of chemotherapeutic agents are found to have immunostimulatory effects, there is a growing interest to combine chemotherapy and immunotherapy for synergistic antitumor effects and improved clinical benefits. Findings from recent studies suggest that highly activated, polyfunctional CD4+ effector T cells have tremendous potential in strengthening and sustaining the overall host antitumor immunity in the postchemotherapy window. This review focuses on the latest progresses regarding the impact of chemotherapy on CD4+ T-cell phenotype and function and discusses the prospect of exploiting CD4+ T cells to control tumor progression and prevent relapse after chemotherapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number890178
JournalClinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume2012
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 19 2012

Fingerprint

T-Lymphocytes
Drug Therapy
Recurrence
Immunotherapy
Immunity
Phenotype
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{a6ab9c790a9d46498066b5f66db9a5b9,
title = "Cytotoxic chemotherapy and CD4+ effector T cells: An emerging alliance for durable antitumor effects",
abstract = "Standard cytotoxic chemotherapy can initially achieve high response rates, but relapses often occur in patients and represent a severe clinical problem. As increasing numbers of chemotherapeutic agents are found to have immunostimulatory effects, there is a growing interest to combine chemotherapy and immunotherapy for synergistic antitumor effects and improved clinical benefits. Findings from recent studies suggest that highly activated, polyfunctional CD4+ effector T cells have tremendous potential in strengthening and sustaining the overall host antitumor immunity in the postchemotherapy window. This review focuses on the latest progresses regarding the impact of chemotherapy on CD4+ T-cell phenotype and function and discusses the prospect of exploiting CD4+ T cells to control tumor progression and prevent relapse after chemotherapy.",
author = "Zhi-Chun Ding and Gang Zhou",
year = "2012",
month = "3",
day = "19",
doi = "10.1155/2012/890178",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "2012",
journal = "Journal of Immunology Research",
issn = "2314-8861",
publisher = "Hindawi Publishing Corporation",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cytotoxic chemotherapy and CD4+ effector T cells

T2 - An emerging alliance for durable antitumor effects

AU - Ding, Zhi-Chun

AU - Zhou, Gang

PY - 2012/3/19

Y1 - 2012/3/19

N2 - Standard cytotoxic chemotherapy can initially achieve high response rates, but relapses often occur in patients and represent a severe clinical problem. As increasing numbers of chemotherapeutic agents are found to have immunostimulatory effects, there is a growing interest to combine chemotherapy and immunotherapy for synergistic antitumor effects and improved clinical benefits. Findings from recent studies suggest that highly activated, polyfunctional CD4+ effector T cells have tremendous potential in strengthening and sustaining the overall host antitumor immunity in the postchemotherapy window. This review focuses on the latest progresses regarding the impact of chemotherapy on CD4+ T-cell phenotype and function and discusses the prospect of exploiting CD4+ T cells to control tumor progression and prevent relapse after chemotherapy.

AB - Standard cytotoxic chemotherapy can initially achieve high response rates, but relapses often occur in patients and represent a severe clinical problem. As increasing numbers of chemotherapeutic agents are found to have immunostimulatory effects, there is a growing interest to combine chemotherapy and immunotherapy for synergistic antitumor effects and improved clinical benefits. Findings from recent studies suggest that highly activated, polyfunctional CD4+ effector T cells have tremendous potential in strengthening and sustaining the overall host antitumor immunity in the postchemotherapy window. This review focuses on the latest progresses regarding the impact of chemotherapy on CD4+ T-cell phenotype and function and discusses the prospect of exploiting CD4+ T cells to control tumor progression and prevent relapse after chemotherapy.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84858163275&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84858163275&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1155/2012/890178

DO - 10.1155/2012/890178

M3 - Review article

VL - 2012

JO - Journal of Immunology Research

JF - Journal of Immunology Research

SN - 2314-8861

M1 - 890178

ER -