Data, models, coefficients: The case of United States military expenditure

Jurgen Brauer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article is an exercise in economic methodology. It replicates two published models of the effect of military expenditure on the United States economy but, in order to study variations in the relevant estimated parameters, applies two different military expenditure data sets to the models (budget vs. National Income and Product Accounts [NIPA] data). In an extension, the article examines coefficient stability when the economically preferred NIPA data are applied across varying time-periods. Two major findings are that economic models should avoid the use of budget data and that even when the preferred NIPA data are used, estimated parameters are highly unstable across time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-64
Number of pages10
JournalConflict Management and Peace Science
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2007

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national product
expenditures
national income
Military
budget
economic model
Coefficients
National income
Military expenditure
economy
methodology
economics
time
Economic methodology
Exercise
Time-varying

Keywords

  • Data sources
  • Defense economics
  • Methodology
  • Military expenditure
  • Replication
  • United States

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Political Science and International Relations

Cite this

Data, models, coefficients : The case of United States military expenditure. / Brauer, Jurgen.

In: Conflict Management and Peace Science, Vol. 24, No. 1, 01.03.2007, p. 55-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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