Delayed intracranial hypertension and cerebellar tonsillar necrosis associated with a depressed occipital skull fracture compressing the superior sagittal sinus. Case report

John R Vender, Karin Bierbrauer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Depressed skull fractures overlying the major venous sinus are often managed nonoperatively because of the high associated risks of surgery in these locations. In the presence of clinical and radiographic evidence of sinus occlusion, however, surgical therapy may be necessary. The authors present the case of a 9-year-old boy with a depressed skull fracture overlying the posterior third of the superior sagittal sinus. After initial conservative treatment, delayed signs of intracranial hypertension and a symptomatic tonsillar herniation with tonsillar necrosis developed. Possible causes as well as diagnostic and treatment options are reviewed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)458-461
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume103 PEDIATRICS
Issue numberSUPPL. 5
StatePublished - Nov 1 2005

Fingerprint

Depressed Skull Fracture
Superior Sagittal Sinus
Intracranial Hypertension
Necrosis
Encephalocele
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Intracranial hypertension
  • Magnetic resonance venography
  • Pediatric neurosurgery
  • Pseudotumor cerebri
  • Skull fracture
  • Superior sagittal sinus
  • Tonsillar herniation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "Depressed skull fractures overlying the major venous sinus are often managed nonoperatively because of the high associated risks of surgery in these locations. In the presence of clinical and radiographic evidence of sinus occlusion, however, surgical therapy may be necessary. The authors present the case of a 9-year-old boy with a depressed skull fracture overlying the posterior third of the superior sagittal sinus. After initial conservative treatment, delayed signs of intracranial hypertension and a symptomatic tonsillar herniation with tonsillar necrosis developed. Possible causes as well as diagnostic and treatment options are reviewed.",
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AB - Depressed skull fractures overlying the major venous sinus are often managed nonoperatively because of the high associated risks of surgery in these locations. In the presence of clinical and radiographic evidence of sinus occlusion, however, surgical therapy may be necessary. The authors present the case of a 9-year-old boy with a depressed skull fracture overlying the posterior third of the superior sagittal sinus. After initial conservative treatment, delayed signs of intracranial hypertension and a symptomatic tonsillar herniation with tonsillar necrosis developed. Possible causes as well as diagnostic and treatment options are reviewed.

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