Density estimates of rural dog populations and an assessment of marking methods during a rabies vaccination campaign in the Philippines

James E. Childs, Laura E. Robinson, Ramses F Sadek, Anthony Madden, Mary Elizabeth Miranda, Noel L. Miranda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We estimated the population density of dogs by distance sampling and assessed the potential utility of two marking methods for capture-mark-recapture applications following a mass canine rabies-vaccination campaign in Sorsogon Province, the Republic of the Philippines. Thirty villages selected to assess vaccine coverage and for dog surveys were visited 1 to 11 days after the vaccinating team. Measurements of the distance of dogs or groups of dogs from transect lines were obtained in 1088 instances (N = 1278 dogs; mean group size = 1.2). Various functions modelling the probability of detection were fitted to a truncated distribution of distances of dogs from transect lines. A hazard rate model provided the best fit and an overall estimate of dog-population density of 468/km2 (95% confidence interval, 359 to 611). At vaccination, most dogs were marked with either a paint stick or a black plastic collar. Overall, 34.8% of 2167 and 28.5% of 2115 dogs could be accurately identified as wearing a collar or showing a paint mark; 49.1% of the dogs had either mark. Increasing time interval between vaccination-team visit and dog survey and increasing distance from transect line were inversely associated with the probability of observing a paint mark. Probability of observing a collar was positively associated with increasing estimated density of the dog population in a given village and with animals not associated with a house. The data indicate that distance sampling is a relatively simple and adaptable method for estimating dog-population density and is not prone to problems associated with meeting some model assumptions inherent to mark-recapture estimators.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)207-218
Number of pages12
JournalPreventive Veterinary Medicine
Volume33
Issue number1-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Immunization Programs
Philippines
Rabies
Rural Population
rabies
vaccination
Dogs
dogs
Population Density
Paint
methodology
paints
collars
population density
Vaccination
villages
Proportional Hazards Models
Plastics
group size
Canidae

Keywords

  • Dog
  • Mark-recapture
  • Philippines
  • Population estimation
  • Rabies virus vaccination
  • Sampling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Animals
  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

Density estimates of rural dog populations and an assessment of marking methods during a rabies vaccination campaign in the Philippines. / Childs, James E.; Robinson, Laura E.; Sadek, Ramses F; Madden, Anthony; Miranda, Mary Elizabeth; Miranda, Noel L.

In: Preventive Veterinary Medicine, Vol. 33, No. 1-4, 01.01.1998, p. 207-218.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Childs, James E. ; Robinson, Laura E. ; Sadek, Ramses F ; Madden, Anthony ; Miranda, Mary Elizabeth ; Miranda, Noel L. / Density estimates of rural dog populations and an assessment of marking methods during a rabies vaccination campaign in the Philippines. In: Preventive Veterinary Medicine. 1998 ; Vol. 33, No. 1-4. pp. 207-218.
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