Derivation of research diagnostic criteria for insomnia: Report of an American Academy of Sleep Medicine work group

Jack D. Edinger, Michael H. Bonnet, Richard R. Bootzin, Karl Doghramji, Cynthia M. Dorsey, Colin A. Espie, Andrew O. Jamieson, W. Vaughn McCall, Charles M. Morin, Edward J. Stepanski

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

622 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Insomnia is a highly prevalent, often debilitating, and economically burdensome form of sleep disturbance caused by. various situational, medical, emotional, environmental and behavioral factors. Although several consensually-derived nosologies have described numerous insomnia phenotypes, research concerning these phenotypes has been greatly hampered by a lack of widely accepted operational research diagnostic criteria (RDC) for their definition. The lack of RDC has, in turn, led to inconsistent research findings for most phenotypes largely due to the variable definitions used for their ascertainment. Given this problem, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) commissioned a Work Group (WG) to review the literature and identify those insomnia phenotypes that appear most valid and tenable. In addition, this WG was asked to derive standardized RDC for these phenotypes and recommend assessment procedures for their ascertainment. This report outlines the WG's findings, the insomnia RDC derived, and research assessment procedures the WG recommends for identifying study participants who meet these RDC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1567-1596
Number of pages30
JournalSleep
Volume27
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 15 2004

Fingerprint

Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Sleep
Medicine
Research
Phenotype

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Edinger, J. D., Bonnet, M. H., Bootzin, R. R., Doghramji, K., Dorsey, C. M., Espie, C. A., ... Stepanski, E. J. (2004). Derivation of research diagnostic criteria for insomnia: Report of an American Academy of Sleep Medicine work group. Sleep, 27(8), 1567-1596. https://doi.org/10.1093/sleep/27.8.1567

Derivation of research diagnostic criteria for insomnia : Report of an American Academy of Sleep Medicine work group. / Edinger, Jack D.; Bonnet, Michael H.; Bootzin, Richard R.; Doghramji, Karl; Dorsey, Cynthia M.; Espie, Colin A.; Jamieson, Andrew O.; McCall, W. Vaughn; Morin, Charles M.; Stepanski, Edward J.

In: Sleep, Vol. 27, No. 8, 15.12.2004, p. 1567-1596.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Edinger, JD, Bonnet, MH, Bootzin, RR, Doghramji, K, Dorsey, CM, Espie, CA, Jamieson, AO, McCall, WV, Morin, CM & Stepanski, EJ 2004, 'Derivation of research diagnostic criteria for insomnia: Report of an American Academy of Sleep Medicine work group', Sleep, vol. 27, no. 8, pp. 1567-1596. https://doi.org/10.1093/sleep/27.8.1567
Edinger JD, Bonnet MH, Bootzin RR, Doghramji K, Dorsey CM, Espie CA et al. Derivation of research diagnostic criteria for insomnia: Report of an American Academy of Sleep Medicine work group. Sleep. 2004 Dec 15;27(8):1567-1596. https://doi.org/10.1093/sleep/27.8.1567
Edinger, Jack D. ; Bonnet, Michael H. ; Bootzin, Richard R. ; Doghramji, Karl ; Dorsey, Cynthia M. ; Espie, Colin A. ; Jamieson, Andrew O. ; McCall, W. Vaughn ; Morin, Charles M. ; Stepanski, Edward J. / Derivation of research diagnostic criteria for insomnia : Report of an American Academy of Sleep Medicine work group. In: Sleep. 2004 ; Vol. 27, No. 8. pp. 1567-1596.
@article{88c77edfceff4666b762c3dc11f2b152,
title = "Derivation of research diagnostic criteria for insomnia: Report of an American Academy of Sleep Medicine work group",
abstract = "Insomnia is a highly prevalent, often debilitating, and economically burdensome form of sleep disturbance caused by. various situational, medical, emotional, environmental and behavioral factors. Although several consensually-derived nosologies have described numerous insomnia phenotypes, research concerning these phenotypes has been greatly hampered by a lack of widely accepted operational research diagnostic criteria (RDC) for their definition. The lack of RDC has, in turn, led to inconsistent research findings for most phenotypes largely due to the variable definitions used for their ascertainment. Given this problem, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) commissioned a Work Group (WG) to review the literature and identify those insomnia phenotypes that appear most valid and tenable. In addition, this WG was asked to derive standardized RDC for these phenotypes and recommend assessment procedures for their ascertainment. This report outlines the WG's findings, the insomnia RDC derived, and research assessment procedures the WG recommends for identifying study participants who meet these RDC.",
author = "Edinger, {Jack D.} and Bonnet, {Michael H.} and Bootzin, {Richard R.} and Karl Doghramji and Dorsey, {Cynthia M.} and Espie, {Colin A.} and Jamieson, {Andrew O.} and McCall, {W. Vaughn} and Morin, {Charles M.} and Stepanski, {Edward J.}",
year = "2004",
month = "12",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1093/sleep/27.8.1567",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "27",
pages = "1567--1596",
journal = "Sleep",
issn = "0161-8105",
publisher = "American Academy of Sleep Medicine",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Derivation of research diagnostic criteria for insomnia

T2 - Report of an American Academy of Sleep Medicine work group

AU - Edinger, Jack D.

AU - Bonnet, Michael H.

AU - Bootzin, Richard R.

AU - Doghramji, Karl

AU - Dorsey, Cynthia M.

AU - Espie, Colin A.

AU - Jamieson, Andrew O.

AU - McCall, W. Vaughn

AU - Morin, Charles M.

AU - Stepanski, Edward J.

PY - 2004/12/15

Y1 - 2004/12/15

N2 - Insomnia is a highly prevalent, often debilitating, and economically burdensome form of sleep disturbance caused by. various situational, medical, emotional, environmental and behavioral factors. Although several consensually-derived nosologies have described numerous insomnia phenotypes, research concerning these phenotypes has been greatly hampered by a lack of widely accepted operational research diagnostic criteria (RDC) for their definition. The lack of RDC has, in turn, led to inconsistent research findings for most phenotypes largely due to the variable definitions used for their ascertainment. Given this problem, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) commissioned a Work Group (WG) to review the literature and identify those insomnia phenotypes that appear most valid and tenable. In addition, this WG was asked to derive standardized RDC for these phenotypes and recommend assessment procedures for their ascertainment. This report outlines the WG's findings, the insomnia RDC derived, and research assessment procedures the WG recommends for identifying study participants who meet these RDC.

AB - Insomnia is a highly prevalent, often debilitating, and economically burdensome form of sleep disturbance caused by. various situational, medical, emotional, environmental and behavioral factors. Although several consensually-derived nosologies have described numerous insomnia phenotypes, research concerning these phenotypes has been greatly hampered by a lack of widely accepted operational research diagnostic criteria (RDC) for their definition. The lack of RDC has, in turn, led to inconsistent research findings for most phenotypes largely due to the variable definitions used for their ascertainment. Given this problem, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) commissioned a Work Group (WG) to review the literature and identify those insomnia phenotypes that appear most valid and tenable. In addition, this WG was asked to derive standardized RDC for these phenotypes and recommend assessment procedures for their ascertainment. This report outlines the WG's findings, the insomnia RDC derived, and research assessment procedures the WG recommends for identifying study participants who meet these RDC.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=19944415865&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=19944415865&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/sleep/27.8.1567

DO - 10.1093/sleep/27.8.1567

M3 - Review article

C2 - 15683149

AN - SCOPUS:19944415865

VL - 27

SP - 1567

EP - 1596

JO - Sleep

JF - Sleep

SN - 0161-8105

IS - 8

ER -