Detection of acetone and isoprene in human breath using a combination of thermal desorption and selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry

Alexa Kathryn Hryniuk, Brian M. Ross

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The measurement of volatile chemicals in human exhalant (breath analysis) has recently emerged as a non-invasive technique with the potential for the early diagnosis of disease. A common method of volatile chemical collection is to capture gases onto a solid phase sorbent followed, at a later time, by thermal release and analysis. This technique, termed thermal desorption (TD), may be a useful means to collect and store breath volatiles in a clinical setting prior to analysis. TD is, however, normally used in conjunction with gas chromatography (TD-GC) which results in slow analysis times and the required use of chemical standards. The new technique of selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) offers a more rapid analysis process without the need for standards. SIFT-MS is normally used to analyze gas concentration in real-time and it is unclear whether combined TD and SIFT-MS can be successfully employed for breath analysis. We found that there was an approximate 1 to 1 concordance between levels of isoprene or acetone in the breath of 12 healthy volunteers measured either using real-time SIFT-MS or offline using a combination of SIFT-MS and TD (TD-SIFT-MS). The use of higher volumes of human breath did impact TD-SIFT-MS measurements of isoprene (but not acetone) with an apparent ceiling effect being observed. Nevertheless our findings demonstrate the potential for breath analysis using a combination of TD and SIFT-MS, an approach which may find utility in a clinical setting which does not allow online analysis of breath.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)26-30
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Mass Spectrometry
Volume285
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Thermal desorption
Isoprene
Pipe flow
Acetone
acetone
Mass spectrometry
mass spectroscopy
desorption
Ions
tubes
ions
Gases
ceilings
isoprene
sorbents
Ceilings
gas chromatography
Sorbents
gases
Gas chromatography

Keywords

  • Acetone
  • Breath sampling
  • Isoprene
  • Selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry
  • Thermal desorption

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Instrumentation
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Spectroscopy
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

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title = "Detection of acetone and isoprene in human breath using a combination of thermal desorption and selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry",
abstract = "The measurement of volatile chemicals in human exhalant (breath analysis) has recently emerged as a non-invasive technique with the potential for the early diagnosis of disease. A common method of volatile chemical collection is to capture gases onto a solid phase sorbent followed, at a later time, by thermal release and analysis. This technique, termed thermal desorption (TD), may be a useful means to collect and store breath volatiles in a clinical setting prior to analysis. TD is, however, normally used in conjunction with gas chromatography (TD-GC) which results in slow analysis times and the required use of chemical standards. The new technique of selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) offers a more rapid analysis process without the need for standards. SIFT-MS is normally used to analyze gas concentration in real-time and it is unclear whether combined TD and SIFT-MS can be successfully employed for breath analysis. We found that there was an approximate 1 to 1 concordance between levels of isoprene or acetone in the breath of 12 healthy volunteers measured either using real-time SIFT-MS or offline using a combination of SIFT-MS and TD (TD-SIFT-MS). The use of higher volumes of human breath did impact TD-SIFT-MS measurements of isoprene (but not acetone) with an apparent ceiling effect being observed. Nevertheless our findings demonstrate the potential for breath analysis using a combination of TD and SIFT-MS, an approach which may find utility in a clinical setting which does not allow online analysis of breath.",
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N2 - The measurement of volatile chemicals in human exhalant (breath analysis) has recently emerged as a non-invasive technique with the potential for the early diagnosis of disease. A common method of volatile chemical collection is to capture gases onto a solid phase sorbent followed, at a later time, by thermal release and analysis. This technique, termed thermal desorption (TD), may be a useful means to collect and store breath volatiles in a clinical setting prior to analysis. TD is, however, normally used in conjunction with gas chromatography (TD-GC) which results in slow analysis times and the required use of chemical standards. The new technique of selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) offers a more rapid analysis process without the need for standards. SIFT-MS is normally used to analyze gas concentration in real-time and it is unclear whether combined TD and SIFT-MS can be successfully employed for breath analysis. We found that there was an approximate 1 to 1 concordance between levels of isoprene or acetone in the breath of 12 healthy volunteers measured either using real-time SIFT-MS or offline using a combination of SIFT-MS and TD (TD-SIFT-MS). The use of higher volumes of human breath did impact TD-SIFT-MS measurements of isoprene (but not acetone) with an apparent ceiling effect being observed. Nevertheless our findings demonstrate the potential for breath analysis using a combination of TD and SIFT-MS, an approach which may find utility in a clinical setting which does not allow online analysis of breath.

AB - The measurement of volatile chemicals in human exhalant (breath analysis) has recently emerged as a non-invasive technique with the potential for the early diagnosis of disease. A common method of volatile chemical collection is to capture gases onto a solid phase sorbent followed, at a later time, by thermal release and analysis. This technique, termed thermal desorption (TD), may be a useful means to collect and store breath volatiles in a clinical setting prior to analysis. TD is, however, normally used in conjunction with gas chromatography (TD-GC) which results in slow analysis times and the required use of chemical standards. The new technique of selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) offers a more rapid analysis process without the need for standards. SIFT-MS is normally used to analyze gas concentration in real-time and it is unclear whether combined TD and SIFT-MS can be successfully employed for breath analysis. We found that there was an approximate 1 to 1 concordance between levels of isoprene or acetone in the breath of 12 healthy volunteers measured either using real-time SIFT-MS or offline using a combination of SIFT-MS and TD (TD-SIFT-MS). The use of higher volumes of human breath did impact TD-SIFT-MS measurements of isoprene (but not acetone) with an apparent ceiling effect being observed. Nevertheless our findings demonstrate the potential for breath analysis using a combination of TD and SIFT-MS, an approach which may find utility in a clinical setting which does not allow online analysis of breath.

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