Diagnosis of periorbital gas on ocular ultrasound after facial trauma

S. Timothy McIlrath, Michael Blaivas, Matthew L Lyon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ocular trauma can occur from isolated facial trauma or in major blunt trauma such as motor vehicle accidents or falls. Despite the etiology of the injury, a thorough evaluation is important but may often be difficult if severe swelling is present. Recently, emergency ultrasound has seen the use of ocular ultrasound to evaluate visual changes and trauma. Literature suggests that unsuspected and difficult to diagnose pathology may be easily detected on ultrasound of the orbit. We present 3 cases of isolated facial trauma in which routine evaluation with ocular ultrasound led to the discovery of periorbital air with one patient having air insufflating the upper lid of the affected side.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)517-520
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Emergency Medicine
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2005

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Gases
Wounds and Injuries
Air
Motor Vehicles
Orbit
Accidents
Emergencies
Pathology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Diagnosis of periorbital gas on ocular ultrasound after facial trauma. / McIlrath, S. Timothy; Blaivas, Michael; Lyon, Matthew L.

In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 23, No. 4, 01.07.2005, p. 517-520.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McIlrath, S. Timothy ; Blaivas, Michael ; Lyon, Matthew L. / Diagnosis of periorbital gas on ocular ultrasound after facial trauma. In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine. 2005 ; Vol. 23, No. 4. pp. 517-520.
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