Diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis and assessment of treatment response through analyses of volatile compound patterns in exhaled breath samples

Nicola M. Zetola, Chawangwa Modongo, Ogopotse Matsiri, Tsaone Tamuhla, Bontle Mbongwe, Keikantse Matlhagela, Enoch Sepako, Alexandro Catini, Giorgio Sirugo, Eugenio Martinelli, Roberto Paolesse, Corrado Di Natale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

53 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives We determined the performance of a sensor array (an electronic nose) made of 8 metalloporphyrins coated quartz microbalances sensors for the diagnosis and prognosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) using exhaled breath samples. Methods TB cases and healthy controls were prospectively enrolled. Signals from volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in breath samples were measured at days 0, 2, 7, 14, and 30 of TB therapy and correlated with clinical and microbiological measurements. Results Fifty one pulmonary TB cases and 20 healthy HIV-uninfected controls were enrolled in the study. 31 (61%) of the 51 pulmonary TB cases were coinfected with HIV. At day 0 (before TB treatment initiation) the sensitivity of our device was estimated at 94.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 83.8–98.8%) and specificity was 90.0% (95% CI, 68.3–98.8%) for distinguishing TB cases from controls. Time-dependent changes in the breath signals were identified as time on TB treatment progressed. Time-dependent signal changes were more pronounced among HIV-uninfected patients. Conclusion The identification of VOCs' signals in breath samples using a sensor array achieved high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of TB and allowed following signal changes during TB treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)367-376
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Infection
Volume74
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Biomarkers
  • Diagnosis
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Sensors
  • Tuberculosis
  • Volatile organic compounds

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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