Dietary arginine, insulin secretion, glucose tolerance and liver lipids during repletion of protein-depleted rats

A. L. Mulloy, F. W. Kari, W. J. Visek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Male Sprague-Dawley rats (~500 g) were fed a very low protein diet (0.5% lactalbumin) for 14 weeks. The average weight loss was 195 g. Following protein depletion the rats were randomly assigned to 5 groups and repleted for 15 days with a purified diet containing 20% protein equivalent as L-amino acids with arginine comprising 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 or 1.0% of the total diet. The absence of dietary arginine during repletion significantly reduced weight gain and efficiency of feed utilization with no apparent change in feed intake. Livers of animals fed 0 and 0.25% arginine were slightly heavier and contained a greater concentration of total lipids than livers from other groups. Intravenous glucose tolerance tests performed on the animals fed 0, 0.5 and 1.0% arginine gave k coefficients for glucose disappearance which were significantly greater (P<.01) for 1.0% arginine (0.12) than for 0.5% arginine (0.56) or 0% arginine (0.45). Plasma insulin for the 1.0% arginine group peaked at 5 min following glucose injection, and declined steadily to near basal levels at 45 min. Plasma insulin for animals repleted with 0 and 0.5% arginine was elevated to a lesser degree than for 1.0% arginine by 5 min but remained above basal levels throughout the experiment and there was a concurrent decrease in the rate of glucose disappearance. The insulinogenic index (Δinsulin/Δglucose) was significantly greater (P<.01) with 1.0% and 0.5% arginine than with 0% arginine. These data suggest that glucose intolerance during arginine deficiency is related to decreased insulin release immediately following glucose administration and possible a mild insulin resistance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)471-475
Number of pages5
JournalHormone and Metabolic Research
Volume14
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1982

Fingerprint

Liver
Arginine
Rats
Insulin
Lipids
Glucose
Proteins
Nutrition
Animals
Diet
Plasmas
Lactalbumin
Protein-Restricted Diet
Glucose Intolerance
Glucose Tolerance Test
Weight Gain
Sprague Dawley Rats
Insulin Resistance
Weight Loss
Amino Acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical

Cite this

Dietary arginine, insulin secretion, glucose tolerance and liver lipids during repletion of protein-depleted rats. / Mulloy, A. L.; Kari, F. W.; Visek, W. J.

In: Hormone and Metabolic Research, Vol. 14, No. 9, 01.01.1982, p. 471-475.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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