Differences of patients and caregivers in determining who should be involved in the selection of venous access devices?

Cynthia C Chernecky, Katherine Nugent, Jennifer L Waller, Denise Macklin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purposes of this study were to describe who should be involved in the vascular access device (VAD) decision-making process, according to patients and caregivers, and to describe if there were differences associated with persons involved in the selection of VADs according to race and gender. Convenience sample included 32 oncology out-patients and 10 caregivers from the southern United States. There were differences by race and sex in decision-making priorities of patients with vascular access devices indwelling; however, these were not statistically significant. Patients, physicians, and oncology nurses were viewed by both patients and caregivers as significant to the decision-making process. In contrast, caregivers were ranked as the least significant by both patients and caregivers. Females chose the physician as the primary decision-maker while males chose the patient as the primary decision-maker.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41-43
Number of pages3
JournalJAVA - Journal of the Association for Vascular Access
Volume9
Issue number1
StatePublished - Mar 1 2004

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Caregivers
Equipment and Supplies
Vascular Access Devices
Decision Making
Physicians
Sex Characteristics
Outpatients
Nurses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

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