Different neuroplasticity for task targets and distractors

Elsie Y. Spingath, Hyun Sug Kang, Thane Plummer, David Trumbull Blake

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Adult learning-induced sensory cortex plasticity results in enhanced action potential rates in neurons that have the most relevant information for the task, or those that respond strongly to one sensory stimulus but weakly to its comparison stimulus. Current theories suggest this plasticity is caused when target stimulus evoked activity is enhanced by reward signals from neuromodulatory nuclei. Prior work has found evidence suggestive of nonselective enhancement of neural responses, and suppression of responses to task distractors, but the differences in these effects between detection and discrimination have not been directly tested. Using cortical implants, we defined physiological responses in macaque somatosensory cortex during serial, matched, detection and discrimination tasks. Nonselective increases in neural responsiveness were observed during detection learning. Suppression of responses to task distractors was observed during discrimination learning, and this suppression was specific to cortical locations that sampled responses to the task distractor before learning. Changes in receptive field size were measured as the area of skin that had a significant response to a constant magnitude stimulus, and these areal changes paralleled changes in responsiveness. From before detection learning until after discrimination learning, the enduring changes were selective suppression of cortical locations responsive to task distractors, and nonselective enhancement of responsiveness at cortical locations selective for target and control skin sites. A comparison of observations in prior studies with the observed plasticity effects suggests that the non-selective response enhancement and selective suppression suffice to explain known plasticity phenomena in simple spatial tasks. This work suggests that differential responsiveness to task targets and distractors in primary sensory cortex for a simple spatial detection and discrimination task arise from nonselective increases in response over a broad cortical locus that includes the representation of the task target, and selective suppression of responses to the task distractor within this locus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere15342
JournalPloS one
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 9 2011

Fingerprint

Neuronal Plasticity
Plasticity
learning
Learning
Discrimination Learning
cortex
Skin
skin (animal)
adult learning
Somatosensory Cortex
Macaca
Reward
loci
Action Potentials
Neurons
action potentials
physiological response
neurons
neuroplasticity
Discrimination (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Different neuroplasticity for task targets and distractors. / Spingath, Elsie Y.; Kang, Hyun Sug; Plummer, Thane; Blake, David Trumbull.

In: PloS one, Vol. 6, No. 1, e15342, 09.02.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Spingath, Elsie Y. ; Kang, Hyun Sug ; Plummer, Thane ; Blake, David Trumbull. / Different neuroplasticity for task targets and distractors. In: PloS one. 2011 ; Vol. 6, No. 1.
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