Differential cAMP gating of glutamatergic signaling regulates long-term state changes in the suprachiasmatic circadian clock

S. A. Tischkau, Eve Ann Gallman, G. F. Buchanan, M. U. Gillette

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Abstract

We investigated a role for cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) in light/glutamate (GLU)-stimulated state changes of the mammalian circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Nocturnal GLU treatment elevated [cAMP]; however, agonists of cAMP/PKA did not mimic the effects of light/GLU. Coincident activation of cAMP/PKA enhanced GLU-stimulated state changes in early night but blocked light/GLU-induced state changes in the late night, whereas inhibition of cAMP/PKA reversed these effects. These responses are distinct from those mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). MAPK inhibitors attenuated both GLU-induced state changes. Although GLU induced mPer1 mRNA in both early and late night, inhibition of PKA blocked this event only in early night, suggesting that cellular mechanisms regulating mPer1 are gated by the suprachiasmatic circadian clock. These data support a diametric gating role for cAMP/PKA in light/GLU-induced SCN state changes: cAMP/PKA promotes the effects of light/GLU in early night, but opposes them in late night.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7830-7837
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume20
Issue number20
StatePublished - Oct 15 2000

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Keywords

  • Glutamate
  • MAP kinase
  • MPer1
  • Protein kinase A
  • Rat
  • Signal transduction
  • Suprachiasmatic nucleus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Tischkau, S. A., Gallman, E. A., Buchanan, G. F., & Gillette, M. U. (2000). Differential cAMP gating of glutamatergic signaling regulates long-term state changes in the suprachiasmatic circadian clock. Journal of Neuroscience, 20(20), 7830-7837.