Differential immunologic effects of language-dominant and nondominant cerebral resections

Kimford J. Meador, Juan M. De Lecuona, Sandra W. Helman, David W. Loring

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To demonstrate whether the cerebral hemispheres (language dominant versus nondominant) affect immune function differentially in humans by delineating the effects of resections for epilepsy surgery on T-cell indices. Background: Cerebral lateralization has been postulated to affect immunomodulation. Differential effects of left versus right cerebral lesions on T-cell numbers and responsiveness have been demonstrated in animals, but the effects in humans are unclear. Methods: Pre- and postoperative changes in T-cell indices were examined in relation to side of language dominance in patients undergoing epilepsy surgery. Results: Absolute lymphocyte count, total T cells (CD3+), helper T cells (CD3++), cytotoxic/suppressor cells (CD3+8+), and total suppressor cells (CD8+) were reduced after language- dominant resections, but were increased after nondominant resections. Conclusions: Although the mechanisms are not fully elucidated, the results demonstrate differential immunologic responses in humans to focal cerebral lesions as a function of cerebral lateralization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1183-1187
Number of pages5
JournalNeurology
Volume52
Issue number6
StatePublished - Apr 12 1999

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Language
T-Lymphocytes
Epilepsy
Immunomodulation
Lymphocyte Count
Cerebrum
Helper-Inducer T-Lymphocytes
Cell Count

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Meador, K. J., De Lecuona, J. M., Helman, S. W., & Loring, D. W. (1999). Differential immunologic effects of language-dominant and nondominant cerebral resections. Neurology, 52(6), 1183-1187.

Differential immunologic effects of language-dominant and nondominant cerebral resections. / Meador, Kimford J.; De Lecuona, Juan M.; Helman, Sandra W.; Loring, David W.

In: Neurology, Vol. 52, No. 6, 12.04.1999, p. 1183-1187.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Meador, KJ, De Lecuona, JM, Helman, SW & Loring, DW 1999, 'Differential immunologic effects of language-dominant and nondominant cerebral resections', Neurology, vol. 52, no. 6, pp. 1183-1187.
Meador KJ, De Lecuona JM, Helman SW, Loring DW. Differential immunologic effects of language-dominant and nondominant cerebral resections. Neurology. 1999 Apr 12;52(6):1183-1187.
Meador, Kimford J. ; De Lecuona, Juan M. ; Helman, Sandra W. ; Loring, David W. / Differential immunologic effects of language-dominant and nondominant cerebral resections. In: Neurology. 1999 ; Vol. 52, No. 6. pp. 1183-1187.
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