Does Pet-Keeping Modify the Association of Delivery Mode with Offspring Body Size?

Andrea E. Cassidy-Bushrow, Ganesa Wegienka, Suzanne Havstad, Albert M. Levin, Susan V. Lynch, Dennis Randall Ownby, Andrew G. Rundle, Kimberley J. Woodcroft, Edward M. Zoratti, Christine Cole Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Caesarean-section (CS) delivery increases risk of childhood obesity, and is associated with a distinct early-life gut microbiome, which may contribute to obesity. Household pets may alter human gut microbiome composition. We examined if pet-keeping modified the association of CS with obesity at age 2 years in 639 Wayne County Health, Environment, Allergy and Asthma Longitudinal Study birth cohort participants. Pet-keeping was defined as having a dog or cat (indoors ≥1 h/day) at child age 2 years. We used logistic regression to test for an interaction between CS and pet-keeping with obesity (BMI ≥ 95th percentile) at age 2 years, adjusted for maternal obesity. A total of 328 (51.3 %) children were male; 367 (57.4 %) were African American; 228 (35.7 %) were born by CS; and 55 (8.6 %) were obese. After adjusting for maternal obesity, CS-born children had a non-significant (P = 0.25) but elevated 1.4 (95 % CI 0.8, 2.5) higher odds of obesity compared to those born vaginally. There was evidence of effect modification between current pet-keeping and delivery mode with obesity at age 2 years (interaction P = 0.054). Compared to children born vaginally without a pet currently in the home, children born via CS without a pet currently in the home had a statistically significant (P = 0.043) higher odds (odds ratio 2.00; 95 % CI 1.02, 3.93) of being obese at age 2 years. Pets modified the CS–BMI relationship; whether the underlying mechanism is through effects on environmental or gut microbiome requires specific investigation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1426-1433
Number of pages8
JournalMaternal and child health journal
Volume19
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

Fingerprint

Pets
Body Size
Cesarean Section
Obesity
Mothers
Pediatric Obesity
Microbiota
African Americans
Longitudinal Studies
Hypersensitivity
Cats
Asthma
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Parturition
Dogs
Health

Keywords

  • Birth cohort
  • Childhood obesity
  • Companion animals
  • Delivery mode

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Cassidy-Bushrow, A. E., Wegienka, G., Havstad, S., Levin, A. M., Lynch, S. V., Ownby, D. R., ... Johnson, C. C. (2015). Does Pet-Keeping Modify the Association of Delivery Mode with Offspring Body Size? Maternal and child health journal, 19(6), 1426-1433. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10995-014-1649-y

Does Pet-Keeping Modify the Association of Delivery Mode with Offspring Body Size? / Cassidy-Bushrow, Andrea E.; Wegienka, Ganesa; Havstad, Suzanne; Levin, Albert M.; Lynch, Susan V.; Ownby, Dennis Randall; Rundle, Andrew G.; Woodcroft, Kimberley J.; Zoratti, Edward M.; Johnson, Christine Cole.

In: Maternal and child health journal, Vol. 19, No. 6, 01.06.2015, p. 1426-1433.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cassidy-Bushrow, AE, Wegienka, G, Havstad, S, Levin, AM, Lynch, SV, Ownby, DR, Rundle, AG, Woodcroft, KJ, Zoratti, EM & Johnson, CC 2015, 'Does Pet-Keeping Modify the Association of Delivery Mode with Offspring Body Size?', Maternal and child health journal, vol. 19, no. 6, pp. 1426-1433. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10995-014-1649-y
Cassidy-Bushrow, Andrea E. ; Wegienka, Ganesa ; Havstad, Suzanne ; Levin, Albert M. ; Lynch, Susan V. ; Ownby, Dennis Randall ; Rundle, Andrew G. ; Woodcroft, Kimberley J. ; Zoratti, Edward M. ; Johnson, Christine Cole. / Does Pet-Keeping Modify the Association of Delivery Mode with Offspring Body Size?. In: Maternal and child health journal. 2015 ; Vol. 19, No. 6. pp. 1426-1433.
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