Ebola virus secreted glycoprotein decreases the anti-viral immunity of macrophages in early inflammatory responses

Jillian H. Bradley, Ametria Harrison, Ashley Corey, Nathan Gentry, Randal K. Gregg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

During Ebola virus (EBOV) infection, secreted glycoprotein (sGP) is found in large quantities in the serum of both patients and infected animal models. It is thought to serve as a decoy for anti-EBOV antibodies. Using an in vitro model incorporating treatment of non-infected human THP-1 macrophages with recombinant EBOV sGP, this study sought to examine the impact of sGP upon key macrophage functions. Macrophage polarization and phagocytic capacity of activated macrophages were found to be unaltered by sGP treatment. However, treatment with sGP inhibited macrophage production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-6 while the yield of anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, remained intact. Interestingly, the migratory ability of macrophages was also diminished by sGP, potentially due to a decrease in expression of CD11b, a vital macrophage integrin. Thus, EBOV sGP may operate to diminish functional contributions of non-infected macrophages to increase the potential viral dissemination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)24-32
Number of pages9
JournalCellular Immunology
Volume324
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Chemotaxis
  • Cytokine
  • Ebola virus
  • Macrophage
  • Phagocytosis
  • Secreted glycoprotein
  • Viral immune evasion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

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