Effect of clinical pharmacy services on the blood pressure of African-American renal transplant patients

Marie A. Chisholm, Laura L. Mulloy, Muralidharan Jagadeesan, Bradley C. Martin, Joseph T. DiPiro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The objective of this study was to determine if African-American renal transplant patients who received direct patient care from a clinical pharmacist had better blood pressure control compared to African-American renal transplant patients who did not have clinical pharmacy services. Methods: Renal transplant patients were prospectively randomized into an intervention group or a control group. Patients in the intervention group received clinical pharmacy services that included a clinical pharmacist performing patient medication reviews, with emphasis on preventing or resolving medication-related problems and providing medication recommendations. Patients in the control group received routine clinic services, but had no clinical pharmacist interaction. Analysis was performed to detect differences between the intervention and control groups in baseline and quarterly systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) for one year post-study enrollment. Results: There were no differences between the intervention (N = 13) and control (N = 10) groups in baseline blood pressures or in the percentage of hypertensive patients. Significant differences in the change in SBP and DBP from baseline between the intervention and control groups were observed at the second, third, and fourth quarters of the study, favoring the intervention group (P <.01). Mean SBP was significantly lower in the intervention group at the second (137.8 ± 15.0 vs 168.9 ± 15.3), third (135.9 ± 11.7 vs 164.6 ± 20.1), and fourth (145.3 ± 16.8 vs 175.8 ± 33.9) quarters of the study (P < .05). Mean DBP was significantly lower in the intervention group at the second (76.0 ± 11.8 vs 84.9 ± 6.1) and fourth (77.0 ± 10.2 vs 91.8 ± 12.0) quarters (P <.05). Conclusion: Direct patient care services provided by a clinical pharmacist, in addition to routine clinical services, have a positive effect on the blood pressure of African-American renal transplant patients. A multidisciplinary team that includes a clinical pharmacist is beneficial to patient care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)392-397
Number of pages6
JournalEthnicity and Disease
Volume12
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Aug 27 2002

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Keywords

  • Clinical pharmacy services
  • Hypertensive African-American patients
  • Hypertensive renal transplant patients

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

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