Effect of local epinephrine on cutaneous bloodflow in the human neck

Timothy P. O’malley, Gregory N Postma, Michael Holtel, Douglas A. Girod

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effectiveness of local anesthetics is improved by the addition of a vasoconstrictor which increases duration of action and decreases both systemic toxic reactions and local bleeding. Epinephrine, the standard drug for vasoconstriction, has some limitations due to potential dose-related cardiac and local toxic effects. The authors examined the minimal effective epinephrine concentration required for maximal cutaneous vasoconstriction in the human subject so as to limit potential dose-related side effects. In a randomized, double-blinded prospective study, 23 patients undergoing head and neck surgical procedures under general anesthesia were enrolled to quantify the effect of subdermal infiltration of 1% lidocaine with epinephrine at varying concentrations on local cutaneous bloodflow utilizing laser Doppler flowmetry. A comparison of the onset of vasoconstriction and magnitude of diminished bloodflow was made for several commonly used concentrations of epinephrine, with 1% lidocaine and normal saline serving as controls. There were no significant differences (P >.05) between epinephrine concentrations of 1:400,000, 1:200,000, 1:100,000, and 1:50,000 when examining onset and magnitude of vasoconstriction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)140-143
Number of pages4
JournalLaryngoscope
Volume105
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Epinephrine
Vasoconstriction
Neck
Skin
Poisons
Lidocaine
Laser-Doppler Flowmetry
Vasoconstrictor Agents
Local Anesthetics
General Anesthesia
Head
Prospective Studies
Hemorrhage
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Effect of local epinephrine on cutaneous bloodflow in the human neck. / O’malley, Timothy P.; Postma, Gregory N; Holtel, Michael; Girod, Douglas A.

In: Laryngoscope, Vol. 105, No. 2, 01.01.1995, p. 140-143.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

O’malley, Timothy P. ; Postma, Gregory N ; Holtel, Michael ; Girod, Douglas A. / Effect of local epinephrine on cutaneous bloodflow in the human neck. In: Laryngoscope. 1995 ; Vol. 105, No. 2. pp. 140-143.
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