Effects of class IV laser therapy on fibromyalgia impact and function in women with fibromyalgia

Lynn Panton, Emily Simonavice, Kristen Williams, Christopher Mojock, Jeong Su Kim, J. Derek Kingsley, Victor McMillan, Reed Mathis

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: This study evaluated the effects of Class IV laser therapy on pain, Fibromyalgia (FM) impact, and physical function in women diagnosed with FM. Design: The study was a double-blind, randomized control trial. Setting: Testing was completed at the university and Rheumatologist office and treatment was completed at a chiropractic clinic. Participants: Thirty-eight (38) women (52±11 years; mean±standard deviation) with FM were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups, laser heat therapy (LHT; n=20) or sham heat therapy (SHT; n=18). Intervention: Both groups received treatment twice a week for 4 weeks. Treatment consisted of application of LHT or SHT over seven tender points located across the neck, shoulders, and back. Treatment was blinded to women and was administered by a chiropractic physician for 7 minutes. Outcome measures: Participants were evaluated before and after treatment for number and sensitivity of tender points, completed the FM Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and the pain question of the FIQ, and were measured for function using the continuous scale physical functional performance (CS-PFP) test. Data were evaluated using repeated-measures analysis of variance with significance accepted at p≤0.05. Results: There were significant interactions for pain measured by the FIQ (LHT: 7.1±2.3 to 6.2±2.1 units; SHT: 5.8±1.3 to 6.1±1.4 units) and for upper body flexibility measured by the CS-PFP (LHT: 71±17 to 78±12 units; SHT: 77±12 to 77±11 units) with the LHT improving significantly compared to SHT. There was a time effect for the measure of FM impact measured by the FIQ, indicating that FM impact significantly improved from pre- to post-treatment in LHT (63±20 to 57±18 units), while no change was observed in the SHT (57±11 to 55±12 units). Conclusions: This study provides evidence that LHT may be a beneficial modality for women with FM in order to improve pain and upper body range of motion, ultimately reducing the impact of FM.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)445-452
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine
Volume19
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2013

Fingerprint

Fibromyalgia
Laser Therapy
Chiropractic
Pain
Therapeutics
Hot Temperature
Articular Range of Motion
Analysis of Variance
Neck
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Physicians
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Complementary and alternative medicine

Cite this

Panton, L., Simonavice, E., Williams, K., Mojock, C., Kim, J. S., Kingsley, J. D., ... Mathis, R. (2013). Effects of class IV laser therapy on fibromyalgia impact and function in women with fibromyalgia. Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 19(5), 445-452. https://doi.org/10.1089/acm.2011.0398

Effects of class IV laser therapy on fibromyalgia impact and function in women with fibromyalgia. / Panton, Lynn; Simonavice, Emily; Williams, Kristen; Mojock, Christopher; Kim, Jeong Su; Kingsley, J. Derek; McMillan, Victor; Mathis, Reed.

In: Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, Vol. 19, No. 5, 01.05.2013, p. 445-452.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Panton, L, Simonavice, E, Williams, K, Mojock, C, Kim, JS, Kingsley, JD, McMillan, V & Mathis, R 2013, 'Effects of class IV laser therapy on fibromyalgia impact and function in women with fibromyalgia', Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, vol. 19, no. 5, pp. 445-452. https://doi.org/10.1089/acm.2011.0398
Panton, Lynn ; Simonavice, Emily ; Williams, Kristen ; Mojock, Christopher ; Kim, Jeong Su ; Kingsley, J. Derek ; McMillan, Victor ; Mathis, Reed. / Effects of class IV laser therapy on fibromyalgia impact and function in women with fibromyalgia. In: Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 19, No. 5. pp. 445-452.
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abstract = "Objectives: This study evaluated the effects of Class IV laser therapy on pain, Fibromyalgia (FM) impact, and physical function in women diagnosed with FM. Design: The study was a double-blind, randomized control trial. Setting: Testing was completed at the university and Rheumatologist office and treatment was completed at a chiropractic clinic. Participants: Thirty-eight (38) women (52±11 years; mean±standard deviation) with FM were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups, laser heat therapy (LHT; n=20) or sham heat therapy (SHT; n=18). Intervention: Both groups received treatment twice a week for 4 weeks. Treatment consisted of application of LHT or SHT over seven tender points located across the neck, shoulders, and back. Treatment was blinded to women and was administered by a chiropractic physician for 7 minutes. Outcome measures: Participants were evaluated before and after treatment for number and sensitivity of tender points, completed the FM Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and the pain question of the FIQ, and were measured for function using the continuous scale physical functional performance (CS-PFP) test. Data were evaluated using repeated-measures analysis of variance with significance accepted at p≤0.05. Results: There were significant interactions for pain measured by the FIQ (LHT: 7.1±2.3 to 6.2±2.1 units; SHT: 5.8±1.3 to 6.1±1.4 units) and for upper body flexibility measured by the CS-PFP (LHT: 71±17 to 78±12 units; SHT: 77±12 to 77±11 units) with the LHT improving significantly compared to SHT. There was a time effect for the measure of FM impact measured by the FIQ, indicating that FM impact significantly improved from pre- to post-treatment in LHT (63±20 to 57±18 units), while no change was observed in the SHT (57±11 to 55±12 units). Conclusions: This study provides evidence that LHT may be a beneficial modality for women with FM in order to improve pain and upper body range of motion, ultimately reducing the impact of FM.",
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N2 - Objectives: This study evaluated the effects of Class IV laser therapy on pain, Fibromyalgia (FM) impact, and physical function in women diagnosed with FM. Design: The study was a double-blind, randomized control trial. Setting: Testing was completed at the university and Rheumatologist office and treatment was completed at a chiropractic clinic. Participants: Thirty-eight (38) women (52±11 years; mean±standard deviation) with FM were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups, laser heat therapy (LHT; n=20) or sham heat therapy (SHT; n=18). Intervention: Both groups received treatment twice a week for 4 weeks. Treatment consisted of application of LHT or SHT over seven tender points located across the neck, shoulders, and back. Treatment was blinded to women and was administered by a chiropractic physician for 7 minutes. Outcome measures: Participants were evaluated before and after treatment for number and sensitivity of tender points, completed the FM Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and the pain question of the FIQ, and were measured for function using the continuous scale physical functional performance (CS-PFP) test. Data were evaluated using repeated-measures analysis of variance with significance accepted at p≤0.05. Results: There were significant interactions for pain measured by the FIQ (LHT: 7.1±2.3 to 6.2±2.1 units; SHT: 5.8±1.3 to 6.1±1.4 units) and for upper body flexibility measured by the CS-PFP (LHT: 71±17 to 78±12 units; SHT: 77±12 to 77±11 units) with the LHT improving significantly compared to SHT. There was a time effect for the measure of FM impact measured by the FIQ, indicating that FM impact significantly improved from pre- to post-treatment in LHT (63±20 to 57±18 units), while no change was observed in the SHT (57±11 to 55±12 units). Conclusions: This study provides evidence that LHT may be a beneficial modality for women with FM in order to improve pain and upper body range of motion, ultimately reducing the impact of FM.

AB - Objectives: This study evaluated the effects of Class IV laser therapy on pain, Fibromyalgia (FM) impact, and physical function in women diagnosed with FM. Design: The study was a double-blind, randomized control trial. Setting: Testing was completed at the university and Rheumatologist office and treatment was completed at a chiropractic clinic. Participants: Thirty-eight (38) women (52±11 years; mean±standard deviation) with FM were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups, laser heat therapy (LHT; n=20) or sham heat therapy (SHT; n=18). Intervention: Both groups received treatment twice a week for 4 weeks. Treatment consisted of application of LHT or SHT over seven tender points located across the neck, shoulders, and back. Treatment was blinded to women and was administered by a chiropractic physician for 7 minutes. Outcome measures: Participants were evaluated before and after treatment for number and sensitivity of tender points, completed the FM Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and the pain question of the FIQ, and were measured for function using the continuous scale physical functional performance (CS-PFP) test. Data were evaluated using repeated-measures analysis of variance with significance accepted at p≤0.05. Results: There were significant interactions for pain measured by the FIQ (LHT: 7.1±2.3 to 6.2±2.1 units; SHT: 5.8±1.3 to 6.1±1.4 units) and for upper body flexibility measured by the CS-PFP (LHT: 71±17 to 78±12 units; SHT: 77±12 to 77±11 units) with the LHT improving significantly compared to SHT. There was a time effect for the measure of FM impact measured by the FIQ, indicating that FM impact significantly improved from pre- to post-treatment in LHT (63±20 to 57±18 units), while no change was observed in the SHT (57±11 to 55±12 units). Conclusions: This study provides evidence that LHT may be a beneficial modality for women with FM in order to improve pain and upper body range of motion, ultimately reducing the impact of FM.

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