Effects of clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, and haloperidol on hostility among patients with schizophrenia

L. Citrome, J. Volavka, P. Czobor, B. Sheitman, J. P. Lindenmayer, Joseph Patrick McEvoy, T. B. Cooper, M. Chakos, J. A. Lieberman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

158 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study compared the specific antiaggressive effects of clozapine with those of olanzapine, risperidone, and haloperidol Methods: A total of 157 inpatients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and a history of suboptimal treatment response were randomly assigned to receive clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, or haloperidol in a double-blind 14-week trial. The trial was divided into two periods: eight weeks during which the dosage was escalated and then fixed, and six weeks during which variable dosages were used. The hostility item of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was the principal outcome measure. Covariates included the items that reflect positive symptoms of schizophrenia (delusions, suspiciousness or feelings of persecution, grandiosity, unusual thought content, conceptual disorganization, and hallucinations) and the sedation item of the Nurses Observation Scale for Inpatient Evaluation (NOSIE). Results: Patients differed in their treatment response as measured by the hostility item of the PANSS. The scores of patients taking clozapine indicated significantly greater improvement than those of patients taking haloperidol or risperidone. The effect on hostility appeared to be independent of the antipsychotic effect of clozapine on other PANSS items that reflect delusional thinking, a formal thought disorder, or hallucinations and independent of sedation as measured by the NOSIE. Neither risperidone nor olanzapine showed superiority to haloperidol. Conclusion: Clozapine has a relative advantage over other antipsychotics as a specific antihostility agent.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1510-1514
Number of pages5
JournalPsychiatric Services
Volume52
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 14 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

olanzapine
Hostility
Risperidone
Clozapine
Haloperidol
Schizophrenia
Inpatients
Hallucinations
Antipsychotic Agents
Nurses
Observation
Delusions
Psychotic Disorders
Emotions
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Citrome, L., Volavka, J., Czobor, P., Sheitman, B., Lindenmayer, J. P., McEvoy, J. P., ... Lieberman, J. A. (2001). Effects of clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, and haloperidol on hostility among patients with schizophrenia. Psychiatric Services, 52(11), 1510-1514. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ps.52.11.1510

Effects of clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, and haloperidol on hostility among patients with schizophrenia. / Citrome, L.; Volavka, J.; Czobor, P.; Sheitman, B.; Lindenmayer, J. P.; McEvoy, Joseph Patrick; Cooper, T. B.; Chakos, M.; Lieberman, J. A.

In: Psychiatric Services, Vol. 52, No. 11, 14.11.2001, p. 1510-1514.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Citrome, L, Volavka, J, Czobor, P, Sheitman, B, Lindenmayer, JP, McEvoy, JP, Cooper, TB, Chakos, M & Lieberman, JA 2001, 'Effects of clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, and haloperidol on hostility among patients with schizophrenia', Psychiatric Services, vol. 52, no. 11, pp. 1510-1514. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ps.52.11.1510
Citrome, L. ; Volavka, J. ; Czobor, P. ; Sheitman, B. ; Lindenmayer, J. P. ; McEvoy, Joseph Patrick ; Cooper, T. B. ; Chakos, M. ; Lieberman, J. A. / Effects of clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, and haloperidol on hostility among patients with schizophrenia. In: Psychiatric Services. 2001 ; Vol. 52, No. 11. pp. 1510-1514.
@article{833e650c3217473292ae6bf9ebf4520b,
title = "Effects of clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, and haloperidol on hostility among patients with schizophrenia",
abstract = "Objective: This study compared the specific antiaggressive effects of clozapine with those of olanzapine, risperidone, and haloperidol Methods: A total of 157 inpatients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and a history of suboptimal treatment response were randomly assigned to receive clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, or haloperidol in a double-blind 14-week trial. The trial was divided into two periods: eight weeks during which the dosage was escalated and then fixed, and six weeks during which variable dosages were used. The hostility item of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was the principal outcome measure. Covariates included the items that reflect positive symptoms of schizophrenia (delusions, suspiciousness or feelings of persecution, grandiosity, unusual thought content, conceptual disorganization, and hallucinations) and the sedation item of the Nurses Observation Scale for Inpatient Evaluation (NOSIE). Results: Patients differed in their treatment response as measured by the hostility item of the PANSS. The scores of patients taking clozapine indicated significantly greater improvement than those of patients taking haloperidol or risperidone. The effect on hostility appeared to be independent of the antipsychotic effect of clozapine on other PANSS items that reflect delusional thinking, a formal thought disorder, or hallucinations and independent of sedation as measured by the NOSIE. Neither risperidone nor olanzapine showed superiority to haloperidol. Conclusion: Clozapine has a relative advantage over other antipsychotics as a specific antihostility agent.",
author = "L. Citrome and J. Volavka and P. Czobor and B. Sheitman and Lindenmayer, {J. P.} and McEvoy, {Joseph Patrick} and Cooper, {T. B.} and M. Chakos and Lieberman, {J. A.}",
year = "2001",
month = "11",
day = "14",
doi = "10.1176/appi.ps.52.11.1510",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "52",
pages = "1510--1514",
journal = "Psychiatric Services",
issn = "1075-2730",
publisher = "American Psychiatric Association",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, and haloperidol on hostility among patients with schizophrenia

AU - Citrome, L.

AU - Volavka, J.

AU - Czobor, P.

AU - Sheitman, B.

AU - Lindenmayer, J. P.

AU - McEvoy, Joseph Patrick

AU - Cooper, T. B.

AU - Chakos, M.

AU - Lieberman, J. A.

PY - 2001/11/14

Y1 - 2001/11/14

N2 - Objective: This study compared the specific antiaggressive effects of clozapine with those of olanzapine, risperidone, and haloperidol Methods: A total of 157 inpatients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and a history of suboptimal treatment response were randomly assigned to receive clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, or haloperidol in a double-blind 14-week trial. The trial was divided into two periods: eight weeks during which the dosage was escalated and then fixed, and six weeks during which variable dosages were used. The hostility item of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was the principal outcome measure. Covariates included the items that reflect positive symptoms of schizophrenia (delusions, suspiciousness or feelings of persecution, grandiosity, unusual thought content, conceptual disorganization, and hallucinations) and the sedation item of the Nurses Observation Scale for Inpatient Evaluation (NOSIE). Results: Patients differed in their treatment response as measured by the hostility item of the PANSS. The scores of patients taking clozapine indicated significantly greater improvement than those of patients taking haloperidol or risperidone. The effect on hostility appeared to be independent of the antipsychotic effect of clozapine on other PANSS items that reflect delusional thinking, a formal thought disorder, or hallucinations and independent of sedation as measured by the NOSIE. Neither risperidone nor olanzapine showed superiority to haloperidol. Conclusion: Clozapine has a relative advantage over other antipsychotics as a specific antihostility agent.

AB - Objective: This study compared the specific antiaggressive effects of clozapine with those of olanzapine, risperidone, and haloperidol Methods: A total of 157 inpatients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and a history of suboptimal treatment response were randomly assigned to receive clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, or haloperidol in a double-blind 14-week trial. The trial was divided into two periods: eight weeks during which the dosage was escalated and then fixed, and six weeks during which variable dosages were used. The hostility item of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was the principal outcome measure. Covariates included the items that reflect positive symptoms of schizophrenia (delusions, suspiciousness or feelings of persecution, grandiosity, unusual thought content, conceptual disorganization, and hallucinations) and the sedation item of the Nurses Observation Scale for Inpatient Evaluation (NOSIE). Results: Patients differed in their treatment response as measured by the hostility item of the PANSS. The scores of patients taking clozapine indicated significantly greater improvement than those of patients taking haloperidol or risperidone. The effect on hostility appeared to be independent of the antipsychotic effect of clozapine on other PANSS items that reflect delusional thinking, a formal thought disorder, or hallucinations and independent of sedation as measured by the NOSIE. Neither risperidone nor olanzapine showed superiority to haloperidol. Conclusion: Clozapine has a relative advantage over other antipsychotics as a specific antihostility agent.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034752929&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034752929&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1176/appi.ps.52.11.1510

DO - 10.1176/appi.ps.52.11.1510

M3 - Article

VL - 52

SP - 1510

EP - 1514

JO - Psychiatric Services

JF - Psychiatric Services

SN - 1075-2730

IS - 11

ER -