Effects of current and former pacifier use on the dentition of 24- to 59-month-old children.

S. M. Adair, M. Milano, I. Lorenzo, C. Russell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Two hundred eighteen children ages 24-59 months participated in a study to examine the effect of pacifier use on the occlusion of the primary dentition. A questionnaire was used to gain information on habit history. Eighty-two children were current or former users of functional exercisers, 38 had a history of conventional pacifier use, and 98 had no history of oral habits. Compared to children with no habit, those with a history of pacifier use had a significantly larger mean overjet (P < 0.001), as well as significantly higher occurrences of Class II primary canines (P = 0.015), distal step molars (P = 0.014), openbite (P = 0.001), and posterior crossbite (P = 0.025). Compared to users of conventional pacifiers, users of functional exercisers had a significantly higher occurrence of Class II primary canines (P = 0.013) and distal step molars (P = 0.037). Pacifier use time in months was significantly higher for children with openbite (P = 0.02) and posterior crossbite (P = 0.019). Compared to former pacifier users, those with current habits had a significantly higher prevalence of openbite (P = 0.002) and posterior crossbite (P = 0.001), and a greater mean openbite (P = 0.19). The reported number of hours use per day was not related to any aspect of the occlusion of pacifier users. African-American and European-American children began their habits at about the same age and used their pacifiers for an equivalent number of hours per day. Among those who had discontinued their habits, African-American children had maintained theirs for a significantly shorter period (P < 0.001), leading to a longer elapsed time between habit discontinuation and the examination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)437-444
Number of pages8
JournalPediatric dentistry
Volume17
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pacifiers
Dentition
Habits
Open Bite
Malocclusion
African Americans
Canidae
Deciduous Tooth
History
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Adair, S. M., Milano, M., Lorenzo, I., & Russell, C. (1995). Effects of current and former pacifier use on the dentition of 24- to 59-month-old children. Pediatric dentistry, 17(7), 437-444.

Effects of current and former pacifier use on the dentition of 24- to 59-month-old children. / Adair, S. M.; Milano, M.; Lorenzo, I.; Russell, C.

In: Pediatric dentistry, Vol. 17, No. 7, 01.01.1995, p. 437-444.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Adair, SM, Milano, M, Lorenzo, I & Russell, C 1995, 'Effects of current and former pacifier use on the dentition of 24- to 59-month-old children.', Pediatric dentistry, vol. 17, no. 7, pp. 437-444.
Adair, S. M. ; Milano, M. ; Lorenzo, I. ; Russell, C. / Effects of current and former pacifier use on the dentition of 24- to 59-month-old children. In: Pediatric dentistry. 1995 ; Vol. 17, No. 7. pp. 437-444.
@article{65cd091db9a041c98a994a218c49e59b,
title = "Effects of current and former pacifier use on the dentition of 24- to 59-month-old children.",
abstract = "Two hundred eighteen children ages 24-59 months participated in a study to examine the effect of pacifier use on the occlusion of the primary dentition. A questionnaire was used to gain information on habit history. Eighty-two children were current or former users of functional exercisers, 38 had a history of conventional pacifier use, and 98 had no history of oral habits. Compared to children with no habit, those with a history of pacifier use had a significantly larger mean overjet (P < 0.001), as well as significantly higher occurrences of Class II primary canines (P = 0.015), distal step molars (P = 0.014), openbite (P = 0.001), and posterior crossbite (P = 0.025). Compared to users of conventional pacifiers, users of functional exercisers had a significantly higher occurrence of Class II primary canines (P = 0.013) and distal step molars (P = 0.037). Pacifier use time in months was significantly higher for children with openbite (P = 0.02) and posterior crossbite (P = 0.019). Compared to former pacifier users, those with current habits had a significantly higher prevalence of openbite (P = 0.002) and posterior crossbite (P = 0.001), and a greater mean openbite (P = 0.19). The reported number of hours use per day was not related to any aspect of the occlusion of pacifier users. African-American and European-American children began their habits at about the same age and used their pacifiers for an equivalent number of hours per day. Among those who had discontinued their habits, African-American children had maintained theirs for a significantly shorter period (P < 0.001), leading to a longer elapsed time between habit discontinuation and the examination.",
author = "Adair, {S. M.} and M. Milano and I. Lorenzo and C. Russell",
year = "1995",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "17",
pages = "437--444",
journal = "Pediatric Dentistry",
issn = "0164-1263",
publisher = "American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of current and former pacifier use on the dentition of 24- to 59-month-old children.

AU - Adair, S. M.

AU - Milano, M.

AU - Lorenzo, I.

AU - Russell, C.

PY - 1995/1/1

Y1 - 1995/1/1

N2 - Two hundred eighteen children ages 24-59 months participated in a study to examine the effect of pacifier use on the occlusion of the primary dentition. A questionnaire was used to gain information on habit history. Eighty-two children were current or former users of functional exercisers, 38 had a history of conventional pacifier use, and 98 had no history of oral habits. Compared to children with no habit, those with a history of pacifier use had a significantly larger mean overjet (P < 0.001), as well as significantly higher occurrences of Class II primary canines (P = 0.015), distal step molars (P = 0.014), openbite (P = 0.001), and posterior crossbite (P = 0.025). Compared to users of conventional pacifiers, users of functional exercisers had a significantly higher occurrence of Class II primary canines (P = 0.013) and distal step molars (P = 0.037). Pacifier use time in months was significantly higher for children with openbite (P = 0.02) and posterior crossbite (P = 0.019). Compared to former pacifier users, those with current habits had a significantly higher prevalence of openbite (P = 0.002) and posterior crossbite (P = 0.001), and a greater mean openbite (P = 0.19). The reported number of hours use per day was not related to any aspect of the occlusion of pacifier users. African-American and European-American children began their habits at about the same age and used their pacifiers for an equivalent number of hours per day. Among those who had discontinued their habits, African-American children had maintained theirs for a significantly shorter period (P < 0.001), leading to a longer elapsed time between habit discontinuation and the examination.

AB - Two hundred eighteen children ages 24-59 months participated in a study to examine the effect of pacifier use on the occlusion of the primary dentition. A questionnaire was used to gain information on habit history. Eighty-two children were current or former users of functional exercisers, 38 had a history of conventional pacifier use, and 98 had no history of oral habits. Compared to children with no habit, those with a history of pacifier use had a significantly larger mean overjet (P < 0.001), as well as significantly higher occurrences of Class II primary canines (P = 0.015), distal step molars (P = 0.014), openbite (P = 0.001), and posterior crossbite (P = 0.025). Compared to users of conventional pacifiers, users of functional exercisers had a significantly higher occurrence of Class II primary canines (P = 0.013) and distal step molars (P = 0.037). Pacifier use time in months was significantly higher for children with openbite (P = 0.02) and posterior crossbite (P = 0.019). Compared to former pacifier users, those with current habits had a significantly higher prevalence of openbite (P = 0.002) and posterior crossbite (P = 0.001), and a greater mean openbite (P = 0.19). The reported number of hours use per day was not related to any aspect of the occlusion of pacifier users. African-American and European-American children began their habits at about the same age and used their pacifiers for an equivalent number of hours per day. Among those who had discontinued their habits, African-American children had maintained theirs for a significantly shorter period (P < 0.001), leading to a longer elapsed time between habit discontinuation and the examination.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0029398128&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0029398128&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 8786910

AN - SCOPUS:0029398128

VL - 17

SP - 437

EP - 444

JO - Pediatric Dentistry

JF - Pediatric Dentistry

SN - 0164-1263

IS - 7

ER -