Effects of d-amphetamine on human aggressive responding maintained by avoidance of provocation

Don R. Cherek, Joel L. Steinberg, Thomas H. Kelly, C Simon Sebastian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Male subjects were administered placebo and three doses of d-amphetamine (5, 10 and 20 mg per 70 kg of body weight) under double-blind conditions in a laboratory setting which provided both aggressive and nonaggressive response options. The nonaggressive response was button pressing maintained by the presentation of points which were exchanged for money. The aggressive response was pressing another button which ostensibly resulted in the subtraction of points from a fictitious person. Aggressive responding was initiated by subtracting points from the subject. Point subtractions were attributed to the other person. Aggressive responding was maintained by an avoidance contingency between aggressive responses and scheduled provoking point subtraction presentations. d-Amphetamine increased nonaggressive responding, while aggressive responding was increased at the 10 mg dose and 20 mg resulted in significant decreases in aggressive responding relative to the 10 mg dose. Comparisons with previous research indicate that the contingency relationship between aggressive responses and presentation of provoking point subtractions can alter the effects of d-amphetamine on aggressive responding.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)65-71
Number of pages7
JournalPharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1989
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dextroamphetamine
Placebos
Body Weight
Research

Keywords

  • Aggressive
  • Human
  • Operant
  • d-Amphetamine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Effects of d-amphetamine on human aggressive responding maintained by avoidance of provocation. / Cherek, Don R.; Steinberg, Joel L.; Kelly, Thomas H.; Sebastian, C Simon.

In: Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior, Vol. 34, No. 1, 01.01.1989, p. 65-71.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{eb7427bad1b24f05bb6e4d18e2191998,
title = "Effects of d-amphetamine on human aggressive responding maintained by avoidance of provocation",
abstract = "Male subjects were administered placebo and three doses of d-amphetamine (5, 10 and 20 mg per 70 kg of body weight) under double-blind conditions in a laboratory setting which provided both aggressive and nonaggressive response options. The nonaggressive response was button pressing maintained by the presentation of points which were exchanged for money. The aggressive response was pressing another button which ostensibly resulted in the subtraction of points from a fictitious person. Aggressive responding was initiated by subtracting points from the subject. Point subtractions were attributed to the other person. Aggressive responding was maintained by an avoidance contingency between aggressive responses and scheduled provoking point subtraction presentations. d-Amphetamine increased nonaggressive responding, while aggressive responding was increased at the 10 mg dose and 20 mg resulted in significant decreases in aggressive responding relative to the 10 mg dose. Comparisons with previous research indicate that the contingency relationship between aggressive responses and presentation of provoking point subtractions can alter the effects of d-amphetamine on aggressive responding.",
keywords = "Aggressive, Human, Operant, d-Amphetamine",
author = "Cherek, {Don R.} and Steinberg, {Joel L.} and Kelly, {Thomas H.} and Sebastian, {C Simon}",
year = "1989",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/0091-3057(89)90354-7",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "34",
pages = "65--71",
journal = "Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior",
issn = "0091-3057",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of d-amphetamine on human aggressive responding maintained by avoidance of provocation

AU - Cherek, Don R.

AU - Steinberg, Joel L.

AU - Kelly, Thomas H.

AU - Sebastian, C Simon

PY - 1989/1/1

Y1 - 1989/1/1

N2 - Male subjects were administered placebo and three doses of d-amphetamine (5, 10 and 20 mg per 70 kg of body weight) under double-blind conditions in a laboratory setting which provided both aggressive and nonaggressive response options. The nonaggressive response was button pressing maintained by the presentation of points which were exchanged for money. The aggressive response was pressing another button which ostensibly resulted in the subtraction of points from a fictitious person. Aggressive responding was initiated by subtracting points from the subject. Point subtractions were attributed to the other person. Aggressive responding was maintained by an avoidance contingency between aggressive responses and scheduled provoking point subtraction presentations. d-Amphetamine increased nonaggressive responding, while aggressive responding was increased at the 10 mg dose and 20 mg resulted in significant decreases in aggressive responding relative to the 10 mg dose. Comparisons with previous research indicate that the contingency relationship between aggressive responses and presentation of provoking point subtractions can alter the effects of d-amphetamine on aggressive responding.

AB - Male subjects were administered placebo and three doses of d-amphetamine (5, 10 and 20 mg per 70 kg of body weight) under double-blind conditions in a laboratory setting which provided both aggressive and nonaggressive response options. The nonaggressive response was button pressing maintained by the presentation of points which were exchanged for money. The aggressive response was pressing another button which ostensibly resulted in the subtraction of points from a fictitious person. Aggressive responding was initiated by subtracting points from the subject. Point subtractions were attributed to the other person. Aggressive responding was maintained by an avoidance contingency between aggressive responses and scheduled provoking point subtraction presentations. d-Amphetamine increased nonaggressive responding, while aggressive responding was increased at the 10 mg dose and 20 mg resulted in significant decreases in aggressive responding relative to the 10 mg dose. Comparisons with previous research indicate that the contingency relationship between aggressive responses and presentation of provoking point subtractions can alter the effects of d-amphetamine on aggressive responding.

KW - Aggressive

KW - Human

KW - Operant

KW - d-Amphetamine

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0024310197&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0024310197&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0091-3057(89)90354-7

DO - 10.1016/0091-3057(89)90354-7

M3 - Article

C2 - 2626455

AN - SCOPUS:0024310197

VL - 34

SP - 65

EP - 71

JO - Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior

JF - Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior

SN - 0091-3057

IS - 1

ER -