Effects of glycosylated hemoglobin on vascular responses in vitro

Christine L. Oltman, David D. Gutterman, Eric C. Scott, Jennifer M. Bocker, Kevin C Dellsperger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Vascular responses to endothelium-dependent vasodilators are greatly impaired in vivo, while isolated blood vessels from animals with diabetes mellitus demonstrate less consistent degrees of impairment. Glycation of proteins, such as hemoglobin, has been implicated in the vascular abnormalities associated with diabetes. Objective: The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that glycosylated hemoglobin is capable of reducing endothelium-dependent vasodilator responses, possibly explaining impaired dilation observed in vivo. Methods: To test this hypothesis, the effect of glycosylated hemoglobin (GH) on vascular responses was studied in several vascular beds, including ventricular microvessels and coronary, mesenteric, femoral, and renal arteries. Coronary arterioles were isolated and mounted between two glass pipettes in a pressurized (30 cmH2O) organ chamber. Isolated artery segments were studied using a standard isometric ring technique. Results: In ventricular microvessels, 10 nM nGH (non-GH) and GH both attenuated the relaxation to Ach. A lower concentration, 1 nM nGH or GH, did not alter dilation to Ach. In coronary, fernoral, mesenteric and renal artery segments, endothelium-dependent responses were not altered by the presence of 10 or 100 nM nGH or GH. Conclusion: In coronary microvessels, and coronary, femoral, mesenteric and renal arteries, GH is not responsible for the impaired endothelial function associated with diabetes mellitus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-184
Number of pages6
JournalCardiovascular Research
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 1997

Fingerprint

Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
Blood Vessels
Mesenteric Arteries
Renal Artery
Microvessels
Endothelium-Dependent Relaxing Factors
Coronary Vessels
Femoral Artery
Dilatation
Diabetes Mellitus
Hemoglobins
Arterioles
Endothelium
Glass
In Vitro Techniques
Arteries
Proteins

Keywords

  • Acetylcholine
  • Coronary vasculature
  • Diabetes
  • Dog
  • Glycosylated hemoglobin
  • Microcirculation
  • arteries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Oltman, C. L., Gutterman, D. D., Scott, E. C., Bocker, J. M., & Dellsperger, K. C. (1997). Effects of glycosylated hemoglobin on vascular responses in vitro. Cardiovascular Research, 34(1), 179-184. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0008-6363(97)00016-3

Effects of glycosylated hemoglobin on vascular responses in vitro. / Oltman, Christine L.; Gutterman, David D.; Scott, Eric C.; Bocker, Jennifer M.; Dellsperger, Kevin C.

In: Cardiovascular Research, Vol. 34, No. 1, 01.04.1997, p. 179-184.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Oltman, CL, Gutterman, DD, Scott, EC, Bocker, JM & Dellsperger, KC 1997, 'Effects of glycosylated hemoglobin on vascular responses in vitro', Cardiovascular Research, vol. 34, no. 1, pp. 179-184. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0008-6363(97)00016-3
Oltman CL, Gutterman DD, Scott EC, Bocker JM, Dellsperger KC. Effects of glycosylated hemoglobin on vascular responses in vitro. Cardiovascular Research. 1997 Apr 1;34(1):179-184. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0008-6363(97)00016-3
Oltman, Christine L. ; Gutterman, David D. ; Scott, Eric C. ; Bocker, Jennifer M. ; Dellsperger, Kevin C. / Effects of glycosylated hemoglobin on vascular responses in vitro. In: Cardiovascular Research. 1997 ; Vol. 34, No. 1. pp. 179-184.
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