Effects of race and family history of type 2 diabetes on metabolic status of women with polycystic ovary syndrome

David A. Ehrmann, Kristen Kasza, Ricardo Azziz, Richard S. Legro, Mahmoud N. Ghazzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

121 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Racial origin and family history of type 2 diabetes impact upon the risk of developing impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes, both of which are common in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). We examined the effects off race and family history of type 2 diabetes on the risk of IGT and type 2 diabetes in a large cohort of women with PCOS. Data obtained at baseline were analyzed from 408 premenopausal women with PCOS. Multivariate linear regression models were used to assess the impact of race (white, black, and other) and family history of type 2 diabetes on body mass index, waist circumference, and waist to hip ratio; glycemic measures (glucose and insulin levels obtained during a standard 75-g oral glucose tolerance test, fasting glucose to insulin ratio, and homeostasis model assessment model of insulin resistance derived from fasting levels of glucose and insulin), hemoglobin A1c, and SHBG, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels. Sixteen (4%) of the 408 patients had type 2 diabetes, 94 (23%) had IGT, and the remaining 298 (73%) had normal glucose tolerance. A history of type 2 diabetes in either parent (FHxPOS) was present in seven (44%) of the 16 diabetic women with PCOS, 37 (39%) of the 94 women with IGT, and 62 (21%) of those with normal glucose tolerance (P < 0.01, by χ2 test). The prevalences of IGT and type 2 diabetes were significantly higher in FHxPOS PCOS women compared with FHxNEG PCOS women, IGT evident in 37 (35%) FHxPOS compared with 57 (19%) FHxNEG women, and type 2 diabetes evident in seven (7%) FHxPOS compared with nine (3%) FHxNEG women. Among the 392 nondiabetic subjects, after adjustment for the effects of race, FHxPOS differed significantly from FHxNEG patients in having a higher mean waist to hip ratio, hemoglobin A1c level, 2-h glucose level, fasting glucose and insulin levels, glucose to insulin ratio, homeostasis model assessment model of insulin resistance, and areas under the glucose and insulin curves during the oral glucose tolerance test. A family history of type 2 diabetes was present with a significantly greater frequency among women with PCOS who had IGT or type 2 diabetes compared with those with normal glucose tolerance. Conversely, a family history of type 2 diabetes in a first-degree relative was associated with a significantly higher risk for IGT or type 2 diabetes in women with PCOS. Even among nondiabetic women with PCOS, a positive family history of type 2 diabetes was strongly associated with metabolic characteristics associated with an increased risk for type 2 diabetes. Finally, the fasting glucose concentration was poorly associated with 2-h glucose concentrations among PCOS women with IGT, suggesting that the fasting glucose concentration is inadequate to predict the presence of IGT in PCOS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)66-71
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume90
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

Fingerprint

Women's Rights
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Medical problems
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Glucose Intolerance
Glucose
Fasting
Insulin
Waist-Hip Ratio
Glucose Tolerance Test
Insulin Resistance
Linear Models
Hemoglobins
Homeostasis
Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate
Waist Circumference

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical

Cite this

Effects of race and family history of type 2 diabetes on metabolic status of women with polycystic ovary syndrome. / Ehrmann, David A.; Kasza, Kristen; Azziz, Ricardo; Legro, Richard S.; Ghazzi, Mahmoud N.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 90, No. 1, 01.01.2005, p. 66-71.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ehrmann, David A. ; Kasza, Kristen ; Azziz, Ricardo ; Legro, Richard S. ; Ghazzi, Mahmoud N. / Effects of race and family history of type 2 diabetes on metabolic status of women with polycystic ovary syndrome. In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2005 ; Vol. 90, No. 1. pp. 66-71.
@article{6ccef9a14ea144e6a4b36a8cb9d2d472,
title = "Effects of race and family history of type 2 diabetes on metabolic status of women with polycystic ovary syndrome",
abstract = "Racial origin and family history of type 2 diabetes impact upon the risk of developing impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes, both of which are common in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). We examined the effects off race and family history of type 2 diabetes on the risk of IGT and type 2 diabetes in a large cohort of women with PCOS. Data obtained at baseline were analyzed from 408 premenopausal women with PCOS. Multivariate linear regression models were used to assess the impact of race (white, black, and other) and family history of type 2 diabetes on body mass index, waist circumference, and waist to hip ratio; glycemic measures (glucose and insulin levels obtained during a standard 75-g oral glucose tolerance test, fasting glucose to insulin ratio, and homeostasis model assessment model of insulin resistance derived from fasting levels of glucose and insulin), hemoglobin A1c, and SHBG, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels. Sixteen (4{\%}) of the 408 patients had type 2 diabetes, 94 (23{\%}) had IGT, and the remaining 298 (73{\%}) had normal glucose tolerance. A history of type 2 diabetes in either parent (FHxPOS) was present in seven (44{\%}) of the 16 diabetic women with PCOS, 37 (39{\%}) of the 94 women with IGT, and 62 (21{\%}) of those with normal glucose tolerance (P < 0.01, by χ2 test). The prevalences of IGT and type 2 diabetes were significantly higher in FHxPOS PCOS women compared with FHxNEG PCOS women, IGT evident in 37 (35{\%}) FHxPOS compared with 57 (19{\%}) FHxNEG women, and type 2 diabetes evident in seven (7{\%}) FHxPOS compared with nine (3{\%}) FHxNEG women. Among the 392 nondiabetic subjects, after adjustment for the effects of race, FHxPOS differed significantly from FHxNEG patients in having a higher mean waist to hip ratio, hemoglobin A1c level, 2-h glucose level, fasting glucose and insulin levels, glucose to insulin ratio, homeostasis model assessment model of insulin resistance, and areas under the glucose and insulin curves during the oral glucose tolerance test. A family history of type 2 diabetes was present with a significantly greater frequency among women with PCOS who had IGT or type 2 diabetes compared with those with normal glucose tolerance. Conversely, a family history of type 2 diabetes in a first-degree relative was associated with a significantly higher risk for IGT or type 2 diabetes in women with PCOS. Even among nondiabetic women with PCOS, a positive family history of type 2 diabetes was strongly associated with metabolic characteristics associated with an increased risk for type 2 diabetes. Finally, the fasting glucose concentration was poorly associated with 2-h glucose concentrations among PCOS women with IGT, suggesting that the fasting glucose concentration is inadequate to predict the presence of IGT in PCOS.",
author = "Ehrmann, {David A.} and Kristen Kasza and Ricardo Azziz and Legro, {Richard S.} and Ghazzi, {Mahmoud N.}",
year = "2005",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1210/jc.2004-0229",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "90",
pages = "66--71",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism",
issn = "0021-972X",
publisher = "The Endocrine Society",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of race and family history of type 2 diabetes on metabolic status of women with polycystic ovary syndrome

AU - Ehrmann, David A.

AU - Kasza, Kristen

AU - Azziz, Ricardo

AU - Legro, Richard S.

AU - Ghazzi, Mahmoud N.

PY - 2005/1/1

Y1 - 2005/1/1

N2 - Racial origin and family history of type 2 diabetes impact upon the risk of developing impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes, both of which are common in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). We examined the effects off race and family history of type 2 diabetes on the risk of IGT and type 2 diabetes in a large cohort of women with PCOS. Data obtained at baseline were analyzed from 408 premenopausal women with PCOS. Multivariate linear regression models were used to assess the impact of race (white, black, and other) and family history of type 2 diabetes on body mass index, waist circumference, and waist to hip ratio; glycemic measures (glucose and insulin levels obtained during a standard 75-g oral glucose tolerance test, fasting glucose to insulin ratio, and homeostasis model assessment model of insulin resistance derived from fasting levels of glucose and insulin), hemoglobin A1c, and SHBG, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels. Sixteen (4%) of the 408 patients had type 2 diabetes, 94 (23%) had IGT, and the remaining 298 (73%) had normal glucose tolerance. A history of type 2 diabetes in either parent (FHxPOS) was present in seven (44%) of the 16 diabetic women with PCOS, 37 (39%) of the 94 women with IGT, and 62 (21%) of those with normal glucose tolerance (P < 0.01, by χ2 test). The prevalences of IGT and type 2 diabetes were significantly higher in FHxPOS PCOS women compared with FHxNEG PCOS women, IGT evident in 37 (35%) FHxPOS compared with 57 (19%) FHxNEG women, and type 2 diabetes evident in seven (7%) FHxPOS compared with nine (3%) FHxNEG women. Among the 392 nondiabetic subjects, after adjustment for the effects of race, FHxPOS differed significantly from FHxNEG patients in having a higher mean waist to hip ratio, hemoglobin A1c level, 2-h glucose level, fasting glucose and insulin levels, glucose to insulin ratio, homeostasis model assessment model of insulin resistance, and areas under the glucose and insulin curves during the oral glucose tolerance test. A family history of type 2 diabetes was present with a significantly greater frequency among women with PCOS who had IGT or type 2 diabetes compared with those with normal glucose tolerance. Conversely, a family history of type 2 diabetes in a first-degree relative was associated with a significantly higher risk for IGT or type 2 diabetes in women with PCOS. Even among nondiabetic women with PCOS, a positive family history of type 2 diabetes was strongly associated with metabolic characteristics associated with an increased risk for type 2 diabetes. Finally, the fasting glucose concentration was poorly associated with 2-h glucose concentrations among PCOS women with IGT, suggesting that the fasting glucose concentration is inadequate to predict the presence of IGT in PCOS.

AB - Racial origin and family history of type 2 diabetes impact upon the risk of developing impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes, both of which are common in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). We examined the effects off race and family history of type 2 diabetes on the risk of IGT and type 2 diabetes in a large cohort of women with PCOS. Data obtained at baseline were analyzed from 408 premenopausal women with PCOS. Multivariate linear regression models were used to assess the impact of race (white, black, and other) and family history of type 2 diabetes on body mass index, waist circumference, and waist to hip ratio; glycemic measures (glucose and insulin levels obtained during a standard 75-g oral glucose tolerance test, fasting glucose to insulin ratio, and homeostasis model assessment model of insulin resistance derived from fasting levels of glucose and insulin), hemoglobin A1c, and SHBG, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels. Sixteen (4%) of the 408 patients had type 2 diabetes, 94 (23%) had IGT, and the remaining 298 (73%) had normal glucose tolerance. A history of type 2 diabetes in either parent (FHxPOS) was present in seven (44%) of the 16 diabetic women with PCOS, 37 (39%) of the 94 women with IGT, and 62 (21%) of those with normal glucose tolerance (P < 0.01, by χ2 test). The prevalences of IGT and type 2 diabetes were significantly higher in FHxPOS PCOS women compared with FHxNEG PCOS women, IGT evident in 37 (35%) FHxPOS compared with 57 (19%) FHxNEG women, and type 2 diabetes evident in seven (7%) FHxPOS compared with nine (3%) FHxNEG women. Among the 392 nondiabetic subjects, after adjustment for the effects of race, FHxPOS differed significantly from FHxNEG patients in having a higher mean waist to hip ratio, hemoglobin A1c level, 2-h glucose level, fasting glucose and insulin levels, glucose to insulin ratio, homeostasis model assessment model of insulin resistance, and areas under the glucose and insulin curves during the oral glucose tolerance test. A family history of type 2 diabetes was present with a significantly greater frequency among women with PCOS who had IGT or type 2 diabetes compared with those with normal glucose tolerance. Conversely, a family history of type 2 diabetes in a first-degree relative was associated with a significantly higher risk for IGT or type 2 diabetes in women with PCOS. Even among nondiabetic women with PCOS, a positive family history of type 2 diabetes was strongly associated with metabolic characteristics associated with an increased risk for type 2 diabetes. Finally, the fasting glucose concentration was poorly associated with 2-h glucose concentrations among PCOS women with IGT, suggesting that the fasting glucose concentration is inadequate to predict the presence of IGT in PCOS.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=12244279029&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=12244279029&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1210/jc.2004-0229

DO - 10.1210/jc.2004-0229

M3 - Article

C2 - 15507516

AN - SCOPUS:12244279029

VL - 90

SP - 66

EP - 71

JO - Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism

JF - Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism

SN - 0021-972X

IS - 1

ER -