Effects of Teaching Evidence-Based Medicine on Physician Assistant Students' Critical Appraisal, Self-Efficacy, and Clinical Application: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Matthew A. Stack, Nailya O. DeLellis, Wallace Boeve, Robert C. Satonik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

PURPOSE: To use a randomized controlled design to explore the effects of evidence-based medicine (EBM) education on physician assistant (PA) students' EBM knowledge, self-efficacy, and evidence-seeking behavior in a simulated clinical situation and to present a model of EBM competence. METHODS: Sixty-one didactic-year PA students from one Midwestern University (2 sequential cohorts) were randomized to receive the standard PA curriculum plus EBM training (intervention) or the standard PA curriculum only (control). Evidence-based medicine knowledge was measured with a validated Fresno test. Self-efficacy was measured with a validated Likert scale. Clinical application of EBM skills was measured with an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). RESULTS: Evidence-based medicine education led to significant improvements on the Fresno and self-efficacy tests, both within and between groups. On the OSCE, the intervention group performed no better than the control group. Higher Fresno pretest scores were significantly related to decreasing improvements in the posttest scores: R = -0.634. CONCLUSION: Teaching EBM to PA students improved their EBM knowledge and self-efficacy but not their clinical application. Future research should focus on enhancing EBM evaluation and application in the clinical setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)159-165
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Physician Assistant Education
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Medical Assisting and Transcription

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Effects of Teaching Evidence-Based Medicine on Physician Assistant Students' Critical Appraisal, Self-Efficacy, and Clinical Application: A Randomized Controlled Trial'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this