Effects of three feedback contingencies on the socially inappropriate talk of a brain-injured adult

Frank D. Lewis, Jack Nelson, Cathy Nelson, Pam Reusink

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study evaluated the differential effects of three types of feedback contingencies on the socially inappropriate talk of a brain injured adult. Three types of feedback-attention and interest, systematic ignoring, and correction-were administered concurrently by three therapists in an alternating treatments design. Data were collected five times per day in naturally occurring brief unstructured conversations. The results revealed that the correction contingency was more effective than systematic ignoring in reducing inappropriate remarks. As expected, attention and interest greatly increased the frequency of the target behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)203-211
Number of pages9
JournalBehavior Therapy
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988

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Effects of three feedback contingencies on the socially inappropriate talk of a brain-injured adult. / Lewis, Frank D.; Nelson, Jack; Nelson, Cathy; Reusink, Pam.

In: Behavior Therapy, Vol. 19, No. 2, 01.01.1988, p. 203-211.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lewis, Frank D. ; Nelson, Jack ; Nelson, Cathy ; Reusink, Pam. / Effects of three feedback contingencies on the socially inappropriate talk of a brain-injured adult. In: Behavior Therapy. 1988 ; Vol. 19, No. 2. pp. 203-211.
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