Efficacy of melaleuca oral solution for the treatment of fluconazole refractory oral candidiasis in AIDS patients

Alena Jandourek, Julie K. Vaishampayan, Jose Antonio Vazquez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of melaleuca oral solution in AIDS patients with fluconazole-resistant oropharyngeal candida infections. Design: A prospective, single center, open-labeled study. Setting: A university-based inner-city HIV/AIDS clinic. Patients: Thirteen patients with AIDS and oral candidiasis documented to be clinically refractory to fluconazole, as defined by failure to respond to a minimum of 14 days of ≤ 400 mg fluconazole per day. Additionally, patients had in vitro resistance to fluconazole, defined by minimal inhibitory concentrations of ≤ 20 μg/ml. Interventions: Patients were given 15 ml melaleuca oral solution four times daily to swish and expel for 2-4 weeks. Main outcome measures: Resolution of clinical lesions of oral pseudomembranous candidiasis lesions. Evaluations were performed weekly for 4 weeks and at the end of therapy for clinical signs of oral candidiasis. Quantitative yeast cultures were performed at each evaluation. Results: A total of 13 patients were entered into the study, 12 were evaluable. At the 2-week evaluation, seven out of 12 patients had improved, none were cured, and six were unchanged. At the 4-week evaluation, eight out of 12 patients showed a response (two cured, six improved), four were non-responders, and one had deteriorated. A mycological response was seen in seven out of 12 patients. A followup evaluation 2-4 weeks after therapy was discontinued revealed that there were no clinical relapses in the two patients who were cured. Conclusions: Melaleuca oral solution appears to be effective as an alternative regimen for AIDS patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis refractory to fluconazole.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1033-1037
Number of pages5
JournalAIDS
Volume12
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 18 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Melaleuca
Oral Candidiasis
Fluconazole
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Therapeutics
Candidiasis
Candida

Keywords

  • Fluconazole refractory
  • Melaleuca oral solution
  • Mucosal candidiasis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Efficacy of melaleuca oral solution for the treatment of fluconazole refractory oral candidiasis in AIDS patients. / Jandourek, Alena; Vaishampayan, Julie K.; Vazquez, Jose Antonio.

In: AIDS, Vol. 12, No. 9, 18.06.1998, p. 1033-1037.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of melaleuca oral solution in AIDS patients with fluconazole-resistant oropharyngeal candida infections. Design: A prospective, single center, open-labeled study. Setting: A university-based inner-city HIV/AIDS clinic. Patients: Thirteen patients with AIDS and oral candidiasis documented to be clinically refractory to fluconazole, as defined by failure to respond to a minimum of 14 days of ≤ 400 mg fluconazole per day. Additionally, patients had in vitro resistance to fluconazole, defined by minimal inhibitory concentrations of ≤ 20 μg/ml. Interventions: Patients were given 15 ml melaleuca oral solution four times daily to swish and expel for 2-4 weeks. Main outcome measures: Resolution of clinical lesions of oral pseudomembranous candidiasis lesions. Evaluations were performed weekly for 4 weeks and at the end of therapy for clinical signs of oral candidiasis. Quantitative yeast cultures were performed at each evaluation. Results: A total of 13 patients were entered into the study, 12 were evaluable. At the 2-week evaluation, seven out of 12 patients had improved, none were cured, and six were unchanged. At the 4-week evaluation, eight out of 12 patients showed a response (two cured, six improved), four were non-responders, and one had deteriorated. A mycological response was seen in seven out of 12 patients. A followup evaluation 2-4 weeks after therapy was discontinued revealed that there were no clinical relapses in the two patients who were cured. Conclusions: Melaleuca oral solution appears to be effective as an alternative regimen for AIDS patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis refractory to fluconazole.",
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