Electronic cigarette use in patients with schizophrenia

Prevalence and attitudes

Brian J Miller, Alexandre Wang, Joyce Wong, Nina Paletta, Peter F. Buckley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Smoking is highly prevalent in patients with schizophrenia. Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are becoming increasingly popular among smokers. Surveys indicate overall favorable attitudes toward the use of e-cigarettes to reduce or quit smoking, relieve withdrawal symptoms, and with respect to perceived health risks; however, less is known about their use in patients with schizophrenia. In the present study, we investigated the prevalence of and attitudes toward e-cigarettes in patients with schizophrenia.

METHODS: Sixty inpatients and outpatients age 18 to 70 with schizophrenia completed a brief survey on e-cigarette use.

RESULTS: Thirty-seven percent of participants reported having tried e-cigarettes, 24% of never-users were considering use, and 7% were current users. Thirty-four percent of surveyed patients believed that the health effects of e-cigarettes were less harmful than regular cigarettes. Health benefits (39%), cutting down (37%), and quitting smoking (37%) were the most frequently cited potential advantages, whereas cost (33%) was the most common potential disadvantage of e-cigarettes. Participants who were ever-users reported that regular cigarettes were significantly more helpful with reducing symptoms such as depression/anxiety, impaired concentration, and paranoia, than e-cigarettes (P < .05 for each).

CONCLUSIONS: These preliminary findings should be investigated in larger samples, but suggest that e-cigarettes have, at best, modest relevance to smoking cessation in patients with schizophrenia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4-10
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of clinical psychiatry : official journal of the American Academy of Clinical Psychiatrists
Volume29
Issue number1
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

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Schizophrenia
Smoking
Tobacco Products
Paranoid Disorders
Electronic Cigarettes
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome
Health
Insurance Benefits
Smoking Cessation
Inpatients
Outpatients
Anxiety
Depression
Costs and Cost Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Electronic cigarette use in patients with schizophrenia : Prevalence and attitudes. / Miller, Brian J; Wang, Alexandre; Wong, Joyce; Paletta, Nina; Buckley, Peter F.

In: Annals of clinical psychiatry : official journal of the American Academy of Clinical Psychiatrists, Vol. 29, No. 1, 01.02.2017, p. 4-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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