Eliciting Responsivity

Exploring Programming Interests of Federal Inmates as a Function of Security Classification

Daniel J. Neller, Michael J Vitacco, Philip R. Magaletta, A. Brooke Phillips-Boyles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Research supports the effectiveness of the Risk-Needs-Responsivity model for reducing criminal recidivism. Yet programming interests of inmates - one facet of responsivity - remain an understudied phenomenon. In the present study, we explored the programming interests of 753 federal inmates housed across three levels of security. Results suggest that inmates, as a group, prefer specific programs over others, and that some of their interests may differ by security level. We discuss possible implications of these findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)423-434
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology
Volume60
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

Fingerprint

Research
Responsivity
Programming

Keywords

  • correctional programming
  • inmates
  • responsivity
  • RNR

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Eliciting Responsivity : Exploring Programming Interests of Federal Inmates as a Function of Security Classification. / Neller, Daniel J.; Vitacco, Michael J; Magaletta, Philip R.; Phillips-Boyles, A. Brooke.

In: International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology, Vol. 60, No. 4, 01.03.2016, p. 423-434.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{8191958d9a9f460084e9b8dadef23bcd,
title = "Eliciting Responsivity: Exploring Programming Interests of Federal Inmates as a Function of Security Classification",
abstract = "Research supports the effectiveness of the Risk-Needs-Responsivity model for reducing criminal recidivism. Yet programming interests of inmates - one facet of responsivity - remain an understudied phenomenon. In the present study, we explored the programming interests of 753 federal inmates housed across three levels of security. Results suggest that inmates, as a group, prefer specific programs over others, and that some of their interests may differ by security level. We discuss possible implications of these findings.",
keywords = "correctional programming, inmates, responsivity, RNR",
author = "Neller, {Daniel J.} and Vitacco, {Michael J} and Magaletta, {Philip R.} and Phillips-Boyles, {A. Brooke}",
year = "2016",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0306624X14557261",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "60",
pages = "423--434",
journal = "International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology",
issn = "0306-624X",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Eliciting Responsivity

T2 - Exploring Programming Interests of Federal Inmates as a Function of Security Classification

AU - Neller, Daniel J.

AU - Vitacco, Michael J

AU - Magaletta, Philip R.

AU - Phillips-Boyles, A. Brooke

PY - 2016/3/1

Y1 - 2016/3/1

N2 - Research supports the effectiveness of the Risk-Needs-Responsivity model for reducing criminal recidivism. Yet programming interests of inmates - one facet of responsivity - remain an understudied phenomenon. In the present study, we explored the programming interests of 753 federal inmates housed across three levels of security. Results suggest that inmates, as a group, prefer specific programs over others, and that some of their interests may differ by security level. We discuss possible implications of these findings.

AB - Research supports the effectiveness of the Risk-Needs-Responsivity model for reducing criminal recidivism. Yet programming interests of inmates - one facet of responsivity - remain an understudied phenomenon. In the present study, we explored the programming interests of 753 federal inmates housed across three levels of security. Results suggest that inmates, as a group, prefer specific programs over others, and that some of their interests may differ by security level. We discuss possible implications of these findings.

KW - correctional programming

KW - inmates

KW - responsivity

KW - RNR

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84957647350&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84957647350&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0306624X14557261

DO - 10.1177/0306624X14557261

M3 - Article

VL - 60

SP - 423

EP - 434

JO - International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology

JF - International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology

SN - 0306-624X

IS - 4

ER -