Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and uterine fibroids

Tiffany A. Katz, Qiwei Yang, Lindsey S. Treviño, Cheryl Lyn Walker, Ayman Al-Hendy

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Uterine fibroids are the most frequent gynecologic tumor, affecting 70% to 80% of women over their lifetime. Although these tumors are benign, they can cause significant morbidity and may require invasive treatments such as myomectomy and hysterectomy. Many risk factors for these tumors have been identified, including environmental exposures to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) such as genistein and diethylstilbestrol. Uterine development may be a particularly sensitive window to environmental exposures, as some perinatal EDC exposures have been shown to increase tumorigenesis in both rodent models and human epidemiologic studies. The mechanisms by which EDC exposures may increase tumorigenesis are still being elucidated, but epigenetic reprogramming of the developing uterus is an emerging hypothesis. Given the remarkably high incidence of uterine fibroids and their significant impact on women's health, understanding more about how prenatal exposures to EDCs (and other environmental agents) may increase fibroid risk could be key to developing prevention and treatment strategies in the future.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)967-977
Number of pages11
JournalFertility and sterility
Volume106
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 15 2016

Fingerprint

Endocrine Disruptors
Leiomyoma
Environmental Exposure
Uterine Myomectomy
Carcinogenesis
Neoplasms
Diethylstilbestrol
Genistein
Women's Health
Hysterectomy
Epigenomics
Uterus
Epidemiologic Studies
Rodentia
Morbidity
Incidence
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Endocrine-disrupting chemicals
  • uterine fibroids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Katz, T. A., Yang, Q., Treviño, L. S., Walker, C. L., & Al-Hendy, A. (2016). Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and uterine fibroids. Fertility and sterility, 106(4), 967-977. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fertnstert.2016.08.023

Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and uterine fibroids. / Katz, Tiffany A.; Yang, Qiwei; Treviño, Lindsey S.; Walker, Cheryl Lyn; Al-Hendy, Ayman.

In: Fertility and sterility, Vol. 106, No. 4, 15.09.2016, p. 967-977.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Katz, TA, Yang, Q, Treviño, LS, Walker, CL & Al-Hendy, A 2016, 'Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and uterine fibroids', Fertility and sterility, vol. 106, no. 4, pp. 967-977. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fertnstert.2016.08.023
Katz TA, Yang Q, Treviño LS, Walker CL, Al-Hendy A. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and uterine fibroids. Fertility and sterility. 2016 Sep 15;106(4):967-977. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fertnstert.2016.08.023
Katz, Tiffany A. ; Yang, Qiwei ; Treviño, Lindsey S. ; Walker, Cheryl Lyn ; Al-Hendy, Ayman. / Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and uterine fibroids. In: Fertility and sterility. 2016 ; Vol. 106, No. 4. pp. 967-977.
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