Endoplasmic reticulum stress response and inflammatory cytokines in type 2 diabetic nephropathy: Role of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and programmed death-1

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Abstract

We tested the hypotheses that a) type 2 diabetes increases endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response, production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and kidney cell death and b) downregulations of renal indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and programmed death-1 (PD-1) contribute to exacerbated inflammation and tissue injury. The growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible protein 153 (GADD153; a marker of ER stress response), inflammatory cytokines and cell death were determined in the context of assessment of IDO and PD-1 in an animal model of type 2 diabetic nephropathy (i.e., db/db mouse). Peripheral blood of 4-month-old db/db mice manifested significantly greater percents of interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-23 positive cells in association with greater percents of cells that were positive for PD-1 or GADD153. Compared to kidneys of db/m controls, renal cells prepared from kidneys of db/db mice displayed a) increased percent of cells that were positive for IL-17, IL-23, PD-1 and GADD153, b) decreased JC-1 aggregates but increased JC-1 monomers suggestive of disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and c) increased apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Immunohistochemical analyses also revealed increased staining of renal tissue of db/db mice for IL-17, IL23, GADD153, Annexin V, caspase 3, PD-1 and IDO compared to db/m kidneys; these changes were generally more prominent in the glomeruli. In conclusion, type 2 diabetes upregulates systemic and local ER stress response and pro-inflammatory mechanisms thereby contributing to renal injury. However, the accompanying upregulations of PD-1 and IDO likely reflect activation of compensatory mechanisms to curtail inflammation and cell injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)343-351
Number of pages9
JournalExperimental and Molecular Pathology
Volume94
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2013

Fingerprint

Indoleamine-Pyrrole 2,3,-Dioxygenase
Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress
Diabetic Nephropathies
Interleukin-17
Cell death
Cytokines
Interleukin-23
Kidney
Medical problems
Transcription Factor CHOP
Tissue
Cell Death
Annexin A5
Caspase 3
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Wounds and Injuries
Animals
Blood
Up-Regulation
Monomers

Keywords

  • Cell death
  • Cytokines
  • Diabetes
  • ER stress response
  • Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase
  • Kidney
  • Programmed death-1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

@article{58e1f8998cdc4f3cbdf71b59a67d11ad,
title = "Endoplasmic reticulum stress response and inflammatory cytokines in type 2 diabetic nephropathy: Role of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and programmed death-1",
abstract = "We tested the hypotheses that a) type 2 diabetes increases endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response, production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and kidney cell death and b) downregulations of renal indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and programmed death-1 (PD-1) contribute to exacerbated inflammation and tissue injury. The growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible protein 153 (GADD153; a marker of ER stress response), inflammatory cytokines and cell death were determined in the context of assessment of IDO and PD-1 in an animal model of type 2 diabetic nephropathy (i.e., db/db mouse). Peripheral blood of 4-month-old db/db mice manifested significantly greater percents of interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-23 positive cells in association with greater percents of cells that were positive for PD-1 or GADD153. Compared to kidneys of db/m controls, renal cells prepared from kidneys of db/db mice displayed a) increased percent of cells that were positive for IL-17, IL-23, PD-1 and GADD153, b) decreased JC-1 aggregates but increased JC-1 monomers suggestive of disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and c) increased apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Immunohistochemical analyses also revealed increased staining of renal tissue of db/db mice for IL-17, IL23, GADD153, Annexin V, caspase 3, PD-1 and IDO compared to db/m kidneys; these changes were generally more prominent in the glomeruli. In conclusion, type 2 diabetes upregulates systemic and local ER stress response and pro-inflammatory mechanisms thereby contributing to renal injury. However, the accompanying upregulations of PD-1 and IDO likely reflect activation of compensatory mechanisms to curtail inflammation and cell injury.",
keywords = "Cell death, Cytokines, Diabetes, ER stress response, Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, Kidney, Programmed death-1",
author = "Babak Baban and Liu, {Jun Yao} and Mozaffari, {Mahmood S}",
year = "2013",
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doi = "10.1016/j.yexmp.2012.11.004",
language = "English (US)",
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pages = "343--351",
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T1 - Endoplasmic reticulum stress response and inflammatory cytokines in type 2 diabetic nephropathy

T2 - Role of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and programmed death-1

AU - Baban, Babak

AU - Liu, Jun Yao

AU - Mozaffari, Mahmood S

PY - 2013/4/1

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N2 - We tested the hypotheses that a) type 2 diabetes increases endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response, production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and kidney cell death and b) downregulations of renal indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and programmed death-1 (PD-1) contribute to exacerbated inflammation and tissue injury. The growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible protein 153 (GADD153; a marker of ER stress response), inflammatory cytokines and cell death were determined in the context of assessment of IDO and PD-1 in an animal model of type 2 diabetic nephropathy (i.e., db/db mouse). Peripheral blood of 4-month-old db/db mice manifested significantly greater percents of interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-23 positive cells in association with greater percents of cells that were positive for PD-1 or GADD153. Compared to kidneys of db/m controls, renal cells prepared from kidneys of db/db mice displayed a) increased percent of cells that were positive for IL-17, IL-23, PD-1 and GADD153, b) decreased JC-1 aggregates but increased JC-1 monomers suggestive of disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and c) increased apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Immunohistochemical analyses also revealed increased staining of renal tissue of db/db mice for IL-17, IL23, GADD153, Annexin V, caspase 3, PD-1 and IDO compared to db/m kidneys; these changes were generally more prominent in the glomeruli. In conclusion, type 2 diabetes upregulates systemic and local ER stress response and pro-inflammatory mechanisms thereby contributing to renal injury. However, the accompanying upregulations of PD-1 and IDO likely reflect activation of compensatory mechanisms to curtail inflammation and cell injury.

AB - We tested the hypotheses that a) type 2 diabetes increases endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response, production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and kidney cell death and b) downregulations of renal indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and programmed death-1 (PD-1) contribute to exacerbated inflammation and tissue injury. The growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible protein 153 (GADD153; a marker of ER stress response), inflammatory cytokines and cell death were determined in the context of assessment of IDO and PD-1 in an animal model of type 2 diabetic nephropathy (i.e., db/db mouse). Peripheral blood of 4-month-old db/db mice manifested significantly greater percents of interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-23 positive cells in association with greater percents of cells that were positive for PD-1 or GADD153. Compared to kidneys of db/m controls, renal cells prepared from kidneys of db/db mice displayed a) increased percent of cells that were positive for IL-17, IL-23, PD-1 and GADD153, b) decreased JC-1 aggregates but increased JC-1 monomers suggestive of disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and c) increased apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Immunohistochemical analyses also revealed increased staining of renal tissue of db/db mice for IL-17, IL23, GADD153, Annexin V, caspase 3, PD-1 and IDO compared to db/m kidneys; these changes were generally more prominent in the glomeruli. In conclusion, type 2 diabetes upregulates systemic and local ER stress response and pro-inflammatory mechanisms thereby contributing to renal injury. However, the accompanying upregulations of PD-1 and IDO likely reflect activation of compensatory mechanisms to curtail inflammation and cell injury.

KW - Cell death

KW - Cytokines

KW - Diabetes

KW - ER stress response

KW - Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase

KW - Kidney

KW - Programmed death-1

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