Endoscopic management of extensive inverted papilloma

Mark J. Jameson, Stilianos E Kountakis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Given the malignant potential and propensity for recurrence of inverted papilloma (IP) of the sinonasal cavity, complete excision is warranted. For disease extending to multiple sites, open surgical oncological procedures are associated with high morbidity and do not assure complete control of the tumor. The endoscopic approach provides excellent visualization, permits removal of diseased mucosa while preserving vital anatomic structures, and allows for excellent postoperative surveillance. Recurrences are identified early and endoscopic resection is repeated as necessary until there is no evidence of disease. Methods: Data were prospectively collected and subsequently reviewed on 18 consecutive patients who underwent endoscopic management of extensive IP (present at more than one anatomic site) between 1999 and 2003. Results: Fourteen men and four women with a mean age of 54 years (range, 36-74 years) were followed for an average of 29 months (range, 6-46 months) after initial endoscopic resection. Seventy-eight percent (14 patients) complained of nasal airway obstruction for more than 6 months and 22% (4 patients) were incidentally noted to have a nasal mass on endoscopy or computed tomography. Eleven patients had undergone therapeutic procedures on initial evaluation. The most common sites affected were maxillary sinus, lamina papyracea, and ethmoid sinus. Patients required an average of 1.6 endoscopic surgeries (range, 1-3 surgeries) to achieve local control; 10 patients (56%) required only one. All patients were symptomatically improved and complications were limited to one cerebrospinal fluid leak, which was repaired intraoperatively. Conclusion: Extensive IP can be controlled using minimally invasive endoscopic procedures as long as close follow-up is maintained. Operative risk and postoperative morbidity are significantly less than observed with open procedures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)446-451
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Rhinology
Volume19
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 1 2005

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Inverted Papilloma
Ethmoid Sinus
Morbidity
Recurrence
Nasal Obstruction
Maxillary Sinus
Nose
Endoscopy
Mucous Membrane
Tomography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Endoscopic management of extensive inverted papilloma. / Jameson, Mark J.; Kountakis, Stilianos E.

In: American Journal of Rhinology, Vol. 19, No. 5, 01.09.2005, p. 446-451.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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