Epigenome-Wide Association Study of Dietary Fiber Intake in African American Adolescents

Li Chen, Yanbin Dong, Xiaoling Wang, Guang Hao, Ying Huang, Bernard Gutin, Haidong Zhu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Scope: Low fiber intake is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Two hypotheses are tested: 1) dietary fiber would be associated with DNA methylation levels; 2) those DNA methylation changes would be associated with visceral adiposity and inflammation. Also the possibility that the associations between fiber and DNA methylation levels might be confounded with folic acid intake as sensitivity analysis are explored. Methods and results: An epigenome-wide association study is conducted using Illumina 450K Bead-Chip on leukocyte DNA in 284 African American adolescents. Linear regression is performed to identify differentially methylated CpG sites associated with fiber. The methylation levels of 3 CpG sites (cg15200711, cg19462022, and cg07035602) in LPCAT1 and RASA3 genes are associated with fiber (false discovery rate [FDR] < 0.05) after adjustment for covariates including folic acid. The methylation levels of cg07035602 and cg19462022 are also associated with visceral adiposity and inflammation. Conclusions: The data show that DNA methylation levels at LPCAT1 and RASA3 genes are associated with dietary fiber intake as well as with adiposity and inflammation. Future studies are warranted to determine whether epigenetic regulation may underlie the beneficial effects of fiber intake on adiposity and inflammation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1800155
JournalMolecular Nutrition and Food Research
Volume62
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2018

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Adiposity
Dietary Fiber
DNA Methylation
African Americans
dietary fiber
Inflammation
adiposity
DNA methylation
Folic Acid
Methylation
inflammation
folic acid
methylation
Epigenomics
Genes
Linear Models
Leukocytes
Cardiovascular Diseases
DNA
epigenetics

Keywords

  • African American
  • DNA methylation
  • adiposity
  • adolescents
  • fiber intake
  • inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Food Science

Cite this

Epigenome-Wide Association Study of Dietary Fiber Intake in African American Adolescents. / Chen, Li; Dong, Yanbin; Wang, Xiaoling; Hao, Guang; Huang, Ying; Gutin, Bernard; Zhu, Haidong.

In: Molecular Nutrition and Food Research, Vol. 62, No. 12, 1800155, 01.06.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Zhu, Haidong

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AB - Scope: Low fiber intake is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Two hypotheses are tested: 1) dietary fiber would be associated with DNA methylation levels; 2) those DNA methylation changes would be associated with visceral adiposity and inflammation. Also the possibility that the associations between fiber and DNA methylation levels might be confounded with folic acid intake as sensitivity analysis are explored. Methods and results: An epigenome-wide association study is conducted using Illumina 450K Bead-Chip on leukocyte DNA in 284 African American adolescents. Linear regression is performed to identify differentially methylated CpG sites associated with fiber. The methylation levels of 3 CpG sites (cg15200711, cg19462022, and cg07035602) in LPCAT1 and RASA3 genes are associated with fiber (false discovery rate [FDR] < 0.05) after adjustment for covariates including folic acid. The methylation levels of cg07035602 and cg19462022 are also associated with visceral adiposity and inflammation. Conclusions: The data show that DNA methylation levels at LPCAT1 and RASA3 genes are associated with dietary fiber intake as well as with adiposity and inflammation. Future studies are warranted to determine whether epigenetic regulation may underlie the beneficial effects of fiber intake on adiposity and inflammation.

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