Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis

Mark H. Ebell

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

143 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Infectious mononucleosis should be suspected in patients 10 to 30 years of age who present with sore throat and significant fatigue, palatal petechiae, posterior cervical or auricular adenopathy, marked adenopathy, or inguinal adenopathy. An atypical lymphocytosis of at least 20 percent or atypical lymphocytosis of at least 10 percent plus lymphocytosis of at least 50 percent strongly supports the diagnosis, as does a positive heterophile antibody test. False-negative results of heterophile antibody tests are relatively common early in the course of infection. Patients with negative results may have another infection, such as toxoplasmosis, streptococcal infection, cytomegalovirus infection, or another viral infection. Symptomatic treatment, the mainstay of care, includes adequate hydration, analgesics, antipyretics, and adequate rest. Bed rest should not be enforced, and the patient's energy level should guide activity. Corticosteroids, acyclovir, and antihistamines are not recommended for routine treatment of infectious mononucleosis, although corticosteroids may benefit patients with respiratory compromise or severe pharyngeal edema. Patients with infectious mononucleosis should be withdrawn from contact or collision sports for at least four weeks after the onset of symptoms. Fatigue, myalgias, and need for sleep may persist for several months after the acute infection has resolved. Copyright

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican family physician
Volume70
Issue number7
StatePublished - Oct 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Infectious Mononucleosis
Human Herpesvirus 4
Lymphocytosis
Heterophile Antibodies
Fatigue
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Infection
Streptococcal Infections
Antipyretics
Bed Rest
Purpura
Acyclovir
Pharyngitis
Groin
Histamine Antagonists
Myalgia
Toxoplasmosis
Cytomegalovirus Infections
Virus Diseases
Sports

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice

Cite this

Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis. / Ebell, Mark H.

In: American family physician, Vol. 70, No. 7, 01.10.2004.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Ebell, Mark H. / Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis. In: American family physician. 2004 ; Vol. 70, No. 7.
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