Erythrocyte sickling during exercise and thermal stress

Michael F. Bergeron, Joseph Gerard Cannon, Elaina L. Hall, Abdullah Kutlar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine effects of exercise in the heat and fluid intake on erythrocyte sickling and neutrophil activation in carriers of sickle cell trait (HbAS). Design, Setting, and Participants: Six African American men (2 HbAS; 42% HbS, 4 HbAA; 20.7 ± 0.8 years; 87.4 ± 9.6 kg) participated in 2 randomized sessions (separate days) each consisting of 45 minutes of brisk walking (treadmill) in a hot (33°C) environment. Intervention: Subjects consumed no fluids or fluid for 3 hours prior to (ad libitum) and during (1.02 L) testing. Main Outcome Measurements: Core temperature, heart rate, and perceived exertion were measured. Forearm venous blood was analyzed for percent erythrocyte sickling and plasma myeloperoxidase. Results: Time-averaged heart rate (126.6 ± 5.7 vs. 146.7 ± 5.9 bpm; P = 0.02) and core temperature (37.6 ± 0.1 vs. 38.1 ± 0.1°C; P < 0.05) responses were lower during fluid versus no fluid, with no statistically significant difference in perceived exertion (12.3 ± 0.5 vs. 13.6 ± 0.4; P = 0.06). Erythrocyte sickling progressively increased (to 3.5%-5.5%) for HbAS carriers during no fluid exercise only. No sickling was detected in HbAA subjects. Plasma myeloperoxidase responses to exercise were greater (P = 0.03) in HbAS versus HbAA. Conclusions: Fluid ingestion at a rate sufficient to offset a body weight deficit can effectively reduce erythrocyte sickling during exercise in the heat.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)354-356
Number of pages3
JournalClinical Journal of Sport Medicine
Volume14
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2004

Fingerprint

Hot Temperature
Erythrocytes
Exercise
Peroxidase
Heart Rate
Sickle Cell Trait
Neutrophil Activation
Temperature
Forearm
African Americans
Walking
Eating
Body Weight
hemoglobin AA

Keywords

  • Hydration
  • Mycloperoxidase
  • Sickle cell trait

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Erythrocyte sickling during exercise and thermal stress. / Bergeron, Michael F.; Cannon, Joseph Gerard; Hall, Elaina L.; Kutlar, Abdullah.

In: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, Vol. 14, No. 6, 01.11.2004, p. 354-356.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bergeron, Michael F. ; Cannon, Joseph Gerard ; Hall, Elaina L. ; Kutlar, Abdullah. / Erythrocyte sickling during exercise and thermal stress. In: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine. 2004 ; Vol. 14, No. 6. pp. 354-356.
@article{31f5a850d8464f27bcf776ac26b72a7f,
title = "Erythrocyte sickling during exercise and thermal stress",
abstract = "Objective: To examine effects of exercise in the heat and fluid intake on erythrocyte sickling and neutrophil activation in carriers of sickle cell trait (HbAS). Design, Setting, and Participants: Six African American men (2 HbAS; 42{\%} HbS, 4 HbAA; 20.7 ± 0.8 years; 87.4 ± 9.6 kg) participated in 2 randomized sessions (separate days) each consisting of 45 minutes of brisk walking (treadmill) in a hot (33°C) environment. Intervention: Subjects consumed no fluids or fluid for 3 hours prior to (ad libitum) and during (1.02 L) testing. Main Outcome Measurements: Core temperature, heart rate, and perceived exertion were measured. Forearm venous blood was analyzed for percent erythrocyte sickling and plasma myeloperoxidase. Results: Time-averaged heart rate (126.6 ± 5.7 vs. 146.7 ± 5.9 bpm; P = 0.02) and core temperature (37.6 ± 0.1 vs. 38.1 ± 0.1°C; P < 0.05) responses were lower during fluid versus no fluid, with no statistically significant difference in perceived exertion (12.3 ± 0.5 vs. 13.6 ± 0.4; P = 0.06). Erythrocyte sickling progressively increased (to 3.5{\%}-5.5{\%}) for HbAS carriers during no fluid exercise only. No sickling was detected in HbAA subjects. Plasma myeloperoxidase responses to exercise were greater (P = 0.03) in HbAS versus HbAA. Conclusions: Fluid ingestion at a rate sufficient to offset a body weight deficit can effectively reduce erythrocyte sickling during exercise in the heat.",
keywords = "Hydration, Mycloperoxidase, Sickle cell trait",
author = "Bergeron, {Michael F.} and Cannon, {Joseph Gerard} and Hall, {Elaina L.} and Abdullah Kutlar",
year = "2004",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/00042752-200411000-00005",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "14",
pages = "354--356",
journal = "Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine",
issn = "1050-642X",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Erythrocyte sickling during exercise and thermal stress

AU - Bergeron, Michael F.

AU - Cannon, Joseph Gerard

AU - Hall, Elaina L.

AU - Kutlar, Abdullah

PY - 2004/11/1

Y1 - 2004/11/1

N2 - Objective: To examine effects of exercise in the heat and fluid intake on erythrocyte sickling and neutrophil activation in carriers of sickle cell trait (HbAS). Design, Setting, and Participants: Six African American men (2 HbAS; 42% HbS, 4 HbAA; 20.7 ± 0.8 years; 87.4 ± 9.6 kg) participated in 2 randomized sessions (separate days) each consisting of 45 minutes of brisk walking (treadmill) in a hot (33°C) environment. Intervention: Subjects consumed no fluids or fluid for 3 hours prior to (ad libitum) and during (1.02 L) testing. Main Outcome Measurements: Core temperature, heart rate, and perceived exertion were measured. Forearm venous blood was analyzed for percent erythrocyte sickling and plasma myeloperoxidase. Results: Time-averaged heart rate (126.6 ± 5.7 vs. 146.7 ± 5.9 bpm; P = 0.02) and core temperature (37.6 ± 0.1 vs. 38.1 ± 0.1°C; P < 0.05) responses were lower during fluid versus no fluid, with no statistically significant difference in perceived exertion (12.3 ± 0.5 vs. 13.6 ± 0.4; P = 0.06). Erythrocyte sickling progressively increased (to 3.5%-5.5%) for HbAS carriers during no fluid exercise only. No sickling was detected in HbAA subjects. Plasma myeloperoxidase responses to exercise were greater (P = 0.03) in HbAS versus HbAA. Conclusions: Fluid ingestion at a rate sufficient to offset a body weight deficit can effectively reduce erythrocyte sickling during exercise in the heat.

AB - Objective: To examine effects of exercise in the heat and fluid intake on erythrocyte sickling and neutrophil activation in carriers of sickle cell trait (HbAS). Design, Setting, and Participants: Six African American men (2 HbAS; 42% HbS, 4 HbAA; 20.7 ± 0.8 years; 87.4 ± 9.6 kg) participated in 2 randomized sessions (separate days) each consisting of 45 minutes of brisk walking (treadmill) in a hot (33°C) environment. Intervention: Subjects consumed no fluids or fluid for 3 hours prior to (ad libitum) and during (1.02 L) testing. Main Outcome Measurements: Core temperature, heart rate, and perceived exertion were measured. Forearm venous blood was analyzed for percent erythrocyte sickling and plasma myeloperoxidase. Results: Time-averaged heart rate (126.6 ± 5.7 vs. 146.7 ± 5.9 bpm; P = 0.02) and core temperature (37.6 ± 0.1 vs. 38.1 ± 0.1°C; P < 0.05) responses were lower during fluid versus no fluid, with no statistically significant difference in perceived exertion (12.3 ± 0.5 vs. 13.6 ± 0.4; P = 0.06). Erythrocyte sickling progressively increased (to 3.5%-5.5%) for HbAS carriers during no fluid exercise only. No sickling was detected in HbAA subjects. Plasma myeloperoxidase responses to exercise were greater (P = 0.03) in HbAS versus HbAA. Conclusions: Fluid ingestion at a rate sufficient to offset a body weight deficit can effectively reduce erythrocyte sickling during exercise in the heat.

KW - Hydration

KW - Mycloperoxidase

KW - Sickle cell trait

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=8644281184&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=8644281184&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00042752-200411000-00005

DO - 10.1097/00042752-200411000-00005

M3 - Article

C2 - 15523207

AN - SCOPUS:8644281184

VL - 14

SP - 354

EP - 356

JO - Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine

JF - Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine

SN - 1050-642X

IS - 6

ER -