Evaluating distance learning in social work education

A replication study

Bruce A. Thyer, Thomas A Artelt, Martha K. Markward, Cheryl D. Dozier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fifty-seven MSW students enrolled in two different practice courses were exposed to approximately equal amounts (five 4-hour sessions) of live, in-class instruction and two-way interactive televised instruction. Separate post-course evaluations of both teaching methods, using a previously published measure of instructional quality, significantly favored live instruction over televised distance learning. More empirical research demonstrating the potential benefits of distance learning technology is urgently needed prior to the widespread adoption of these methods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)291-295
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Social Work Education
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998

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distance learning
social work
instruction
education
method of teaching
empirical research
evaluation
student

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Evaluating distance learning in social work education : A replication study. / Thyer, Bruce A.; Artelt, Thomas A; Markward, Martha K.; Dozier, Cheryl D.

In: Journal of Social Work Education, Vol. 34, No. 2, 01.01.1998, p. 291-295.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thyer, Bruce A. ; Artelt, Thomas A ; Markward, Martha K. ; Dozier, Cheryl D. / Evaluating distance learning in social work education : A replication study. In: Journal of Social Work Education. 1998 ; Vol. 34, No. 2. pp. 291-295.
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