Exercise and diet induced weight loss improves measures of oxidative stress and insulin sensitivity in adults with characteristics of the metabolic syndrome

R. Scott Rector, Shana O. Warner, Ying Liu, Pamela S. Hinton, Grace Y. Sun, Richard H. Cox, Craig S. Stump, M. Harold Laughlin, Kevin C Dellsperger, Tom R. Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

94 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Obesity and insulin resistance (IR) increase the risk for coronary heart disease; however, much of this risk is not attributable to traditional risk factors. We sought to determine whether weight loss associated with supervised aerobic exercise beneficially alters biomarkers of oxidative stress and whether these alterations are associated with improvements in measures of insulin resistance. Twenty-five sedentary and overweight to obese [body mass index (BMI) = 33.0 ± 0.8 kg/m2] individuals, with characteristics of the metabolic syndrome, participated in a 4- to 7-mo weight loss program that consisted of energy restriction (reduced by ∼500 kcal/day) and supervised aerobic exercise (5 days/wk, 45 min/day at 60% V̇O2 max; ∼375 kcal/day). IR and insulin sensitivity were assessed by the calculation of the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), respectively. Oxidative stress was assessed by oxidized LDL (oxLDL), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and low- and high- density lipoprotein (LDL and HDL) lipid hydroperoxide concentrations in serum. Indexes for antioxidative status included apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1) concentrations and paraoxonase-1 (PON1) activity and protein concentrations. Exercise- and diet-induced weight loss (∼10%) significantly (P < 0.05) increased insulin sensitivity and reduced IR, oxLDL, and LDL lipid hydroperoxides but did not alter HDL lipid hydroperoxides or MPO concentrations. Lifestyle modification impacted systemic antioxidative status by increasing apoA1 concentrations and reducing serum PON1 protein and activity. Changes in oxidative stress were not associated with alterations in HOMA or QUICKI. Diet- and exercise-induced weight loss (∼10%) improves measures of insulin sensitivity and beneficially alters biomarkers of oxidative status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume293
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2007

Fingerprint

Reducing Diet
Insulin Resistance
Oxidative Stress
Lipid Peroxides
Aryldialkylphosphatase
Peroxidase
Weight Loss
Homeostasis
Biomarkers
Exercise
Weight Reduction Programs
Apolipoproteins
Apolipoprotein A-I
HDL Lipoproteins
Serum
LDL Lipoproteins
Coronary Disease
Life Style
Proteins
Body Mass Index

Keywords

  • Energy restriction
  • Insulin resistance
  • Oxidized low-density lipoprotein
  • Paraoxonase-1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Exercise and diet induced weight loss improves measures of oxidative stress and insulin sensitivity in adults with characteristics of the metabolic syndrome. / Rector, R. Scott; Warner, Shana O.; Liu, Ying; Hinton, Pamela S.; Sun, Grace Y.; Cox, Richard H.; Stump, Craig S.; Laughlin, M. Harold; Dellsperger, Kevin C; Thomas, Tom R.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 293, No. 2, 01.08.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rector, R. Scott ; Warner, Shana O. ; Liu, Ying ; Hinton, Pamela S. ; Sun, Grace Y. ; Cox, Richard H. ; Stump, Craig S. ; Laughlin, M. Harold ; Dellsperger, Kevin C ; Thomas, Tom R. / Exercise and diet induced weight loss improves measures of oxidative stress and insulin sensitivity in adults with characteristics of the metabolic syndrome. In: American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2007 ; Vol. 293, No. 2.
@article{c2f1dbd1df404c63961c6a29d6e40f87,
title = "Exercise and diet induced weight loss improves measures of oxidative stress and insulin sensitivity in adults with characteristics of the metabolic syndrome",
abstract = "Obesity and insulin resistance (IR) increase the risk for coronary heart disease; however, much of this risk is not attributable to traditional risk factors. We sought to determine whether weight loss associated with supervised aerobic exercise beneficially alters biomarkers of oxidative stress and whether these alterations are associated with improvements in measures of insulin resistance. Twenty-five sedentary and overweight to obese [body mass index (BMI) = 33.0 ± 0.8 kg/m2] individuals, with characteristics of the metabolic syndrome, participated in a 4- to 7-mo weight loss program that consisted of energy restriction (reduced by ∼500 kcal/day) and supervised aerobic exercise (5 days/wk, 45 min/day at 60{\%} V̇O2 max; ∼375 kcal/day). IR and insulin sensitivity were assessed by the calculation of the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), respectively. Oxidative stress was assessed by oxidized LDL (oxLDL), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and low- and high- density lipoprotein (LDL and HDL) lipid hydroperoxide concentrations in serum. Indexes for antioxidative status included apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1) concentrations and paraoxonase-1 (PON1) activity and protein concentrations. Exercise- and diet-induced weight loss (∼10{\%}) significantly (P < 0.05) increased insulin sensitivity and reduced IR, oxLDL, and LDL lipid hydroperoxides but did not alter HDL lipid hydroperoxides or MPO concentrations. Lifestyle modification impacted systemic antioxidative status by increasing apoA1 concentrations and reducing serum PON1 protein and activity. Changes in oxidative stress were not associated with alterations in HOMA or QUICKI. Diet- and exercise-induced weight loss (∼10{\%}) improves measures of insulin sensitivity and beneficially alters biomarkers of oxidative status.",
keywords = "Energy restriction, Insulin resistance, Oxidized low-density lipoprotein, Paraoxonase-1",
author = "Rector, {R. Scott} and Warner, {Shana O.} and Ying Liu and Hinton, {Pamela S.} and Sun, {Grace Y.} and Cox, {Richard H.} and Stump, {Craig S.} and Laughlin, {M. Harold} and Dellsperger, {Kevin C} and Thomas, {Tom R.}",
year = "2007",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1152/ajpendo.00116.2007",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "293",
journal = "American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology",
issn = "0363-6135",
publisher = "American Physiological Society",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Exercise and diet induced weight loss improves measures of oxidative stress and insulin sensitivity in adults with characteristics of the metabolic syndrome

AU - Rector, R. Scott

AU - Warner, Shana O.

AU - Liu, Ying

AU - Hinton, Pamela S.

AU - Sun, Grace Y.

AU - Cox, Richard H.

AU - Stump, Craig S.

AU - Laughlin, M. Harold

AU - Dellsperger, Kevin C

AU - Thomas, Tom R.

PY - 2007/8/1

Y1 - 2007/8/1

N2 - Obesity and insulin resistance (IR) increase the risk for coronary heart disease; however, much of this risk is not attributable to traditional risk factors. We sought to determine whether weight loss associated with supervised aerobic exercise beneficially alters biomarkers of oxidative stress and whether these alterations are associated with improvements in measures of insulin resistance. Twenty-five sedentary and overweight to obese [body mass index (BMI) = 33.0 ± 0.8 kg/m2] individuals, with characteristics of the metabolic syndrome, participated in a 4- to 7-mo weight loss program that consisted of energy restriction (reduced by ∼500 kcal/day) and supervised aerobic exercise (5 days/wk, 45 min/day at 60% V̇O2 max; ∼375 kcal/day). IR and insulin sensitivity were assessed by the calculation of the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), respectively. Oxidative stress was assessed by oxidized LDL (oxLDL), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and low- and high- density lipoprotein (LDL and HDL) lipid hydroperoxide concentrations in serum. Indexes for antioxidative status included apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1) concentrations and paraoxonase-1 (PON1) activity and protein concentrations. Exercise- and diet-induced weight loss (∼10%) significantly (P < 0.05) increased insulin sensitivity and reduced IR, oxLDL, and LDL lipid hydroperoxides but did not alter HDL lipid hydroperoxides or MPO concentrations. Lifestyle modification impacted systemic antioxidative status by increasing apoA1 concentrations and reducing serum PON1 protein and activity. Changes in oxidative stress were not associated with alterations in HOMA or QUICKI. Diet- and exercise-induced weight loss (∼10%) improves measures of insulin sensitivity and beneficially alters biomarkers of oxidative status.

AB - Obesity and insulin resistance (IR) increase the risk for coronary heart disease; however, much of this risk is not attributable to traditional risk factors. We sought to determine whether weight loss associated with supervised aerobic exercise beneficially alters biomarkers of oxidative stress and whether these alterations are associated with improvements in measures of insulin resistance. Twenty-five sedentary and overweight to obese [body mass index (BMI) = 33.0 ± 0.8 kg/m2] individuals, with characteristics of the metabolic syndrome, participated in a 4- to 7-mo weight loss program that consisted of energy restriction (reduced by ∼500 kcal/day) and supervised aerobic exercise (5 days/wk, 45 min/day at 60% V̇O2 max; ∼375 kcal/day). IR and insulin sensitivity were assessed by the calculation of the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), respectively. Oxidative stress was assessed by oxidized LDL (oxLDL), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and low- and high- density lipoprotein (LDL and HDL) lipid hydroperoxide concentrations in serum. Indexes for antioxidative status included apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1) concentrations and paraoxonase-1 (PON1) activity and protein concentrations. Exercise- and diet-induced weight loss (∼10%) significantly (P < 0.05) increased insulin sensitivity and reduced IR, oxLDL, and LDL lipid hydroperoxides but did not alter HDL lipid hydroperoxides or MPO concentrations. Lifestyle modification impacted systemic antioxidative status by increasing apoA1 concentrations and reducing serum PON1 protein and activity. Changes in oxidative stress were not associated with alterations in HOMA or QUICKI. Diet- and exercise-induced weight loss (∼10%) improves measures of insulin sensitivity and beneficially alters biomarkers of oxidative status.

KW - Energy restriction

KW - Insulin resistance

KW - Oxidized low-density lipoprotein

KW - Paraoxonase-1

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34547617157&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34547617157&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1152/ajpendo.00116.2007

DO - 10.1152/ajpendo.00116.2007

M3 - Article

VL - 293

JO - American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology

JF - American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology

SN - 0363-6135

IS - 2

ER -