Expeditionary Resuscitation Surgical Team: The US Army's Initiative to Provide Damage Control Resuscitation and Surgery to Forces in Austere Settings

Matthew D'Angelo, John Losch, Bret Smith, Mark Geslak, Shon Compton, Kenneth Wofford, Jason M. Seery, Michael Morrison, Ian Wedmore, James Paimore, Kirby Gross, Peter J. Cuenca, Matthew D. Welder

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Improvements in surgical care on the battlefield have contributed to reduced morbidity and mortality in wounded Servicemembers. 1 Point-of-injury care and early surgical intervention, along with improved personal protective equipment, have produced the lowest casualty statistics in modern warfare, resulting in improved force strength, morale, and social acceptance of conflict. It is undeniable that point-of-care injury, followed by early resuscitation and damage control surgery, saves lives on the battlefield. The US Army's Expeditionary Resuscitation Surgical Team (ERST) is a highly mobile, interprofessional medical team that can perform damage control resuscitation and surgery in austere locations. Its configuration and capabilities vary; however, in general, a typical surgical element can perform one major surgery and one minor surgery without resupply. The critical care element can provide prolonged holding in garrison, but this diminishes in the austere setting with complex and acutely injured patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)76-79
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of special operations medicine : a peer reviewed journal for SOF medical professionals
Volume17
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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